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The attention of prospective matriculants is directed to the state- 
ment on page 30 concerning the filing of applications for admission. 

All announcements and regulations contained in this Calendar apply 
to the current session only. 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves the right to make such changes 
in the regulations and courses of study at any time as experience may 
prove desirable. 

All requests for information should be addressed to the Secretary 
of the Medical Faculty, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario. 


(iPurrn a InturrHitg 
Htbrarg 

KINGSTON, ONTARIO 


QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY 

KINGSTON, CANADA 



INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER IN 1841 


CALENDAR 

of 

THE FACULTY OF MEDICJNE 


NINETY-SIXTH SESSION 
1947-48 



CONTENTS 


Calendar 

Academic Year 

Plan of the University Grounds ’ 

Time Tables 

History of the University 

Government and Administration 

Officers of Administration 

Officers of Instruction 

Other Officers 

Equipment and Special Facilities 

Medical Buildings 

Laboratories 

Hospitals - 

Ontario Cancer Foundation, Kingston Clinic 

University Library 

Medical Library 


Page 
. 4 

. 5 


s ! 

6 i 

9 I 

12 I 

15 i 


21 

25 

26 

26 

26 

27 

27 

28 

29 


Music Room 


29 


Page 


General Information 30 

Admission of Students 30 

Matriculation Examinations 31 

Registration 32 

Fraternities 32 

Curriculum 32 

Examinations and Graduation 33 

Fees ; 35 

Microscopes 36 

Physical Welfare of Students 37 

Athletics 37 

The Alma Mater and ^Esculapian Societies 38 

Military Services 39 

Higher Degrees 40 

Degree of Master of Science, M.Sc. (Med.) 40 

Diploma of Public Health (D.P.H.) 41 

Diploma in Medical Radiology (D.M.R.) 42 

Scholarships and Honours 44 

Requirements for License 53 

Courses of Instruction 55 

Degrees Conferred 76 

Medallists and Holders of Scholarships 78 


Students in Attendance .. 


83 


1 

1 











CALENDAR 























1947 













JANUARY 



FEBRUARY 




MARCH 





APRIL 



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MAY 





JUNE 





JULY 





AUGUST 



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27 

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31 







SEPTEMBER 



OCTOBER 



NOVEMBER 



DECEMBER 


S 

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31 .... 

















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1948 


JANUARY 



FEBRUARY 




MARCH 





APRIL 



s 

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1 

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: 3 

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.... 1 

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31 .... 



25 

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30 




MAY 





JUNE 





JULY 





AUGUST 



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.... 1 

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SO 




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SEPTEMBER 




OCTOBER 



NOVEMBER 



DECEMBER 


S 

M 

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w 

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1 

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i 






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1 2 

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ALBERT 



BUILDINGS OF QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY 


BARRIE 


PLAN OF QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY GROUNDS 


1. Central Heating Plant 

2. Commerce Building 

3. Observatory 

4. Ban Righ Hall 

5. Old Arts Building 

6. Principal's Residence 

7. Old Medical Building 

8. Hydraulics Laboratory 
y. Medical Laboratory 

10. Jock Harty Arena 

11. Carruchers Hall 

12. T^loming Hall 


13. Technical Supplies and Storehouse 24. Miller Hall 


14. i^echanical Laboratory 

15. Nicol Hall 

16. Gordon Hall 
37. Douglas Library 
18. Ontario Hall 
10. Grant Hall 

20. Kingston Hall 

21. Richardson Stadium 

22. Leonard Field 

23. Kingston General Hospital 
and Richardson Laboratory 


25. Gymnasium 

26. Students’ Memorial Union 

27. Gordon House 

28. Goodwin House 

29. Macdonnell House 

30. Muir House 

31. Craine Building 

32. Gun Shed 

33. Matheson House 


ACADEMIC YEAR 


Ninety-sixth Session 


1947 

Sept. It Monday — Supplemental examinations for first, second, third, 
fourth and sixth years will be held during the week 
of September 1st. (Clinical examinations will be held 
in Kingston during the week of September 15.) 

Sept. 22, Monday — Registration in all years. 

Sept. 23 f Tuesday — Classes open for all years. 

Oct. 16, Thursday — University Day. 

Dec. 20, Saturday — Christmas holidays begin at noon. 


1948 

Jan. 5, Monday — Classes reopen. 

Mar. 25, Thursday — Easter recess begins at 5.30 p.m. 

Mar. 26, Frida/y — Good Friday. 

Mar. 28, Sunday — Easter Sunday. 

Mar. 31, Wednesday — Classes reopen. 

Apr. 5, Monday — Lister Day. 

May 8, Saturday — Classes close in all years. 

May 10, Monday — Final examinations begin for first, second, third, 
fourth and fifth years. 

May 15, Saturday — University Convocation for conferring degrees 
upon graduates of the Faculties of Arts and 
Science. 

It is to be clearly understood that the above dates are tentative 
and may be altered in consideration of changed conditions. 


208100 


TIME TABLE FOR FIRST YEAR (New Course) 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 



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— — 


First term — Histology; Second term — Embryology 

^The class in Biochemistry on Friday afternoon will run from 1 p.m. to 4.80 p.m. 


TIME TABLE FOR THIRD YEAR (New Course) 

Hoars Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 


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♦These classes meet in sections on alternate Thursdays. 

Psychiatry Section A will alternate with Parasitology Section B and Psychiatry Seection B will 
alternate with Parasitology Section A. 


HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 


Queen’s University owes its origin to the desire of the Synod of 
the Presbyterian Church in Canada in connection with the Church of 
Scotland for a ministry trained within the country. As early as 1832 
the Provincial Government had been petitioned “to endow without delay 
an institution, or professorships, for the education and training of 
young men for the ministry in connection with the Synod.” This and 
other representations failing of their object, steps were taken by the 
Synod to found a college at Kingston on the lines of the Scottish Na- 
tional Universities. On October 16th, 1841, a Royal Charter was issued 
by Her Majesty Queen Victoria for the establishment of Queen’s Col- 
lege, Kingston, and the first classes were opened in March, 1842, with 
the Rev. Dr. Liddell as Principal. Funds were provided in part by 
grants from the Presbyterian Church in Scotland, and from the Cana- 
dian Government, and in part by liberal subscriptions from the friends 
of the young and growing University. In 1867-68 the withdrawal of 
the Provincial grant, and the failure of the Commercial Bank, which 
swept away the greater part of the endowment, almost brought financial 
disaster. But the crisis was met by the determination of Principal 
Snodgrass and of other self-denying workers chief among whom was 
Professor Mackerras. The country was canvassed for subscriptions, 
and as a result of the widespread interest aroused, $113,000 was added 
to the endowment. 

In 1877 Principal Snodgrass was succeeded by the Rev. G. M. 
Grant who for a quarter of a century built with brilliant success upon 
the foundation laid by his predecessors. Under his guidance the Uni- 
versity gained rapidly in size and prestige. In 1887, as the result of 
an effort in commemoration of the Queen's Jubilee, $250,000 was raised, 
resulting in further extension, and in the establishment of new pro- 
fessorships. 

Principal Grant died in 1902, and was succeeded in the following 
year by the Very Rev. D. M. Gordon. In 1916, owing to ill-health. 
Principal Gordon resigned his position but continued in office until the 
autumn of 1917, when the Rev. R. Bruce Taylor was appointed as his 
successor. In 1930 Principal Taylor resigned his position and went 
abroad to live, and Dr. J. C. Connell was appointed Acting-Principal 
until a new Principal should be found. In October, W. Hamilton Fyfe, 
Head of Christ’s Hospital, England, and formerly Fellow of Merton 
College, Oxford, was installed as Principal. Principal Fyfe resigned in 


— 9 — 


1936 to accept the Principal ship of the University of Aberdeen, Scot- 
land. Dr. Fjrfe was succeeded by Principal R. C. Wallace, President 
of the University of Alberta from 1928 to 1936. 

In 1854 the Medical Faculty of Queen’s was established. It was 
reorganized in 1866 as the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons in 
affiliation with the University, but in 1891 the original status was re- 
sumed. 

Queen’s led the way in co-education. As early as 1870 special 
classes in English and other subjects were formed for women, but 
courses leading to a degree were not thrown open to them until 1878-79. 
In 1880 co-education was extended to the medical course, and in 1883 
a separate Women’s Medical College was opened and affiliated with 
Queen’s. It was closed in 1894, as similar facilities were offered in 
Toronto and elsewhere. In 1943, for the first time in 49 years, women 
were again admitted to the Faculty of Medicine. 

In 1907 the Ontario Government established at Queen’s a Faculty of 
Education for the purpose of providing professional training for teach- 
ers in the secondary schools of the Province. In 1920, however, the work 
of the Faculty was discontinued because of the decision of the Govern- 
ment to extend the scope of the Normal Schools and to create in Toronto 
the Ontario College for Teachers. 

The School of Mining was founded in 1893 under an Ontario charter 
and for several sessions all its departments were housed in Carruthers 
Hall, erected in 1889. The Provincial Legislature in 1900 provided 
Ontario Hall for the Departments of Physics, Geology and Min- 
eralogy and Fleming Hall for the Departments of Civil, Mechanical, 
and Electrical Engineering. In 1911 the Provincial Government erected 
Gordon Hall, which is entirely used by the Department of Chemistry, 
and through the generosity of the late Professor Nicol and other 
graduates, Nicol Hall was built to provide class rooms and laboratories 
for the Department of Mining and Metallurgy. The School of Mining 
was amalgamated with the University in 1916 and now constitutes its 
Faculty of Applied Science. 

The endowment of the University is at present about $2,450,000, 
of which about $900,000 was obtained in 1918-19. To this sum the late 
Chancellor Dr. Douglas contributed $500,000 and the Carnegie Corpora- 
tion $250,000. The annual income of the University, derived from all 
sources, is nearly $800,000. 

There is now on the University Campus a stately group of buildings, 
comprising the Old Arts Building (now the Theological Building) ; 
Carruthers Hall (Civil Engineering); Kingston Hall (Arts), the gift 
of the city of Kingston; Grant Hall, erected by students, graduates and 


— 10 — 


friends in honour of Principal Grant; Ontario Hall (Physics, Chemical 
Engineering) ; Fleming Hall (Mechanical and Electrical Engineering) ; 
Gordon Hall (Chemistry) ; Nicol Hall (Mining and Metallurgy) ; the 
Medical Building (Anatomy and Preventive Medicine) ; the Medical 
Laboratories Building; the Craine Building, named in honour of Dr. 
Agnes Douglas Craine who left a capital sum of $375,000 for the teach- 
ing of Biochemistry; the G 3 nnnasium; Miller Hall (Geology and 
Mineralogy), named in memory of the late Dr. W. G. Miller; the Ob- 
servatory; the Douglas Library, named in memory of Dr. James Douglas, 
a former chancellor of the University, who contributed $150,000. 

Queen^s University, though founded by a Church, was dedicated to 
the nation. As its constituency expanded, its constitution was gradu- 
ally broadened until finally in 1912, as a result of an amicable arrange- 
ment between the Presbyterian Church and the Trustees of the University, 
an act was passed by the Dominion Parliament removing the last vestige 
of denominational control. The registration of students has grown 
from 665 in 1900 to over 6,300 in the present session, and Queen’s has 
become nation-wide in its work and influence. 


- 11 


GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 


The administration of the University is vested in the Board of Trus- 
tees, the University Council, the Senate, and the Faculty Boards. 

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

The Board of Trustees consists of the Chancellor, the Principal, and 
the Rector; one representative from each affiliated college; representa- 
tives as provided for by the Statutes from the University Council, the 
Benefactors, the Graduates; and members elected by the Board of 
Trustees. 

The functions of the Board of Trustees are to manage the finances, 
to possess and care for the property, to procure legislation, to appoint 
instructors and other officers, and in general to attend to such external 
matters as do not relate directly to instruction. 


THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

The University Council consists of the Chancellor, the Trustees, the 
members of the Senate, and an equal number of members elected by the 
Graduates from their own numbers. 

The annual meeting of the Council is held on the day immedi- 
•Ately preceding the Spring Convocation. 

"The functions of the Council are: 

ll) To elect the Chancellor, except when two or more candidates 
are nominated, in which case the election is by registered graduates. 

(2) To elect six trustees, two of whom shall retire annually. 

(3) To make by-laws governing the election of the Rector by the 
registered students, of seven trustees by the benefactors, of six trustees 
by the University Council, and of six trustees by the graduates. 

(4) To discuss all questions relating to the University and its 
welfare. 

(5) To make representation of its views to the Senate or the Board 
of Trustees. 

(6) To decide on proposals for affiliation. 


— 12 — 


(7) To arrange all matters pertaining to (a) its own meetings and 
business, (b) the meetings and proceedings of Convocation, (c) the in- 
stallation of the Chancellor, (d) the fees for memberships, registration 
and voting. 

THE SENATE 

The Senate consists of: 

The Principal. 

The Vice-Principal. 

The Principal of Queen’s Theological College. 

The Dean of the Faculty of Arts. 

The Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. 

The Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science. 

Three Professors elected by the Faculty of Arts. 

Three Professors elected by the Faculty of Medicine. 

Three Professors elected by the Faculty of Applied Science. 

Two Professors elected by the Faculty of Queen Theological 
College. 

The functions of the Senate are: 

(1) To determine all matters of an academic character which con- 
cern the University as a whole. 

(2) To consider and determine all courses of study leading to a de- 
gree, including conditions of Matriculation, on recommendation of the 
respective Faculty Boards; but the Senate shall not embody any 
changes without having previously presented these to the Faculty. 

(3) To recommend to the Board of Trustees the establishment of 
any additional Faculty, Department, Chair or Course of Instruction in 
the University. 

(4) To be the medium of communication between the Alma Mater 
Society and the Governing Boards. 

(5) To determine all regulations regarding the social functions 
of the students within the University, and regarding the University 
Library and University Reading Rooms. 

(6) To publish the University Calendars. 

(7) To conduct examinations. 

(8) To grant Degrees. 

(9) To award University Scholarships, Medals, and Prizes. 


— 13 — 


(10) To enforce the Statutes, Rules, and Ordinances of the Univer- 
sity. 

(11) To make such recommendations to the Governing Boards as 
may be deemed expedient for promoting the interests of the University. 


THE FACULTY BOARD 

The Dean, Professors, Associate Professors, and Assistant Profes- 
sors, have power to meet as a separate board, and to administer the 
affairs of the Faculty under such regulations as the Board of Trustees 
may prescribe. The Principal and Vice-Principal are members of the 
Faculty Board, of which the Principal is ex-officio president. 

The functions of the Faculty Board are: 

(1) To recommend to the Senate courses of study leading to a de- 
gree, and the conditions of admission. 

(2) To decide upon applications for admission or for change of 
course, subject to the regulations of the Senate. 

(3) To submit to the Senate names for both ordinary and honorary 
degrees. 

(4) To arrange the time-table for classes and to edit the Faculty 
Calendar, subject to the approval of the Senate. 

(5) To control registration, and determine the amount of fees and 
manner of payment, subject to the regulations of the Senate. 

(6) To deal with class failures. 

(7) To exercise academic supervision over students. 

(8) To make such recommendations to the Senate as may be 
deemed expedient for promoting the efficiency of the University. 

(9) To award Faculty Scholarships, Medals, and Prizes. 

(10) To appoint such sessional assistants, fellows, tutors, and de- 
monstrators as shall be needed to give instruction in the subjects taught 
by the Faculty. 

(11) To pass such regulations and by-laws as may be necessary for 
the exercise of the functions of the Faculty. 


— 14 — 


OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 


THE UNIVERSITY 

Chancellor — The Honourable Charles Avery Dunning, P.C., LL.D. 
Chairman of the Board of Trustees — J. M. Macdonnell, M.C., M.A., 
LL.D., K.C., M.P. 

Principal and Vice-Chancellor — Robert C. Wallace, C.M.G., M.A., 
D.Sc,, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., F.G.S., F.R.S.C. 

Vice- Principal and Dean of the Faculty of Arts — W. A. Mackintosh, 
C.M.G., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., F.R.S.C. 

Rector — B. K. Sandwell, B.A., LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S.C. 

Registrar — Jean I. Royce, B.A. 

Dfan of Women — A. Vibert Douglas, M.B.E., M.Sc., Ph.D. 

Librarian — H. P. Gundy, M.A. 

Director of Endowment and Treasurer — G. J. Smith, B.A., B.Sc. 
Director, Department of University Extension — Harry K. Hutton, 
M.A., B.Paed. 

Director of Summer School — H. L. Tracy, B.A., Ph.D. 

Director, ^School of Nursing — Dorothy M. Riches, R.R.C., B.A., Reg.N. 
Assistant Registrar — K. Jean Richardson, B.A. 

Assistant Director, Department of University Extension — Kathleen 
L. Healey. 

Medical Officer — P. M. Macdonnell, M.A., M.V'.,C.M. 

University Chaplain — Rev. A. M. Laverty, B.A., B.D. 

Adviser to Veterans — W. D. MacClement, B.A., Ph.D. 

Chief Proctor — H. J. Styles, B.Sc. 

Secetary of the General Alumni Association and Manager of the 
Employment Bureau — H. J. Hamilton, B.A. 

Secretary-Treasurer of the Athletic Board of Control — Charles 
Hicks. 

Maintenance Engineer — R. Hinton. 

THE FACULTY OF ARTS 
(Founded 1841) 

Dean— W. A. Mackintosh, C.M.G., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., F.R.S.C. 
Secretary — Jean I. Royce, B.A. 

THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE 
(Founded 1854) 

Dean — G. Spencer Melvin, M.D. 

Secretary — John H. Orr, M.D,,C.M., F.R.C.P. (C). 


- 15 — 


THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE 
(Founded 1893) 

Dean — D. S. Ellis, D.S.O., B.Sc., M.A., M.C.E. 

Secretary — A. Jackson, B.Sc. 

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Chairman — J. M. Macdonnell, M.C., M.A., LL.D., K.C., M.P. 

Ex-Officio Members 

The Honourable Charles Avery Dunning, P.C., LL.D Chancellor 

Robert C. Wallace, C.M.G., M.A., D.Sc., Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., F.G.S., 

F.R.S.C Principal 

B. K. Sandwell, B.A., LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S.C Rector 

Elective Members 
Retire 19^8 

H. G. Bertram, B.Sc.^ Dundas, Ont. 

Rev. G. a. Brown, M.A., B.D., D.D.® Kingston, Ont. 

E. a. Collins, B.Sc., LL.D.s Copper Cliff, Ont. 

Senator A. C. Hardy, B.A., LL.B., P.C., K.C.® Brockville, Ont. 

R. D. Harkness, D.S.O., M.C., B.Sc.^ Montreal, Que. 

M. N. Hay, B.Sc.^ Kingston, Ont. 

H. G. Hilton, B.Sc.® Hamilton, Ont. 

Dennis Jordan, B.A., M.D.,C.M.® Toronto, Ont. 

D. H, Laird, M.A., LL.D., K.C.^ Winnipeg, Man. 

B. M. Stewart, M.A., Ph.D.® New York, N.Y. 

Retire 19 ^9 

His Honour Judge C. A. Cameron, B.A.^ Belleville Ont. 

W. C. Clark, C.M.G., M.A., LL.D.^ Ottawa, Ont. 

J. G. Dwyer, M.A., M.D.,C.M., LL.D.® New York, N.Y. 

J. C. Macfarlane, M.A., K.C.i Toronto, Ont. 

T. A. McGinnis, B.Sc.^ Kingston, Ont. 

D. I. McLeod, B.A.® Toronto, Ont. 

Alexander Macphail, C.M.G., D.S.O., B.Sc., LL.D.3 Kingston, Ont. 

A. E. MacRae, B.Sc. 7 Ottawa, Ont. 

R. M. Smith, B.Sc., LL.D.® Toronto, Ont. 

J. B. Stirling, B.A., B.Sc.^ Montreal, Que. 


— 16 — 


Retire 1950 


Mrs. H. B. Campbell, B.A.^ Montreal, Que. 

J. A. Edmison, B.A., K.C.3 Toronto, Ont. 

J. M. Farrell, B.A., LL.D., K.C.® Kingston, Ont. 

D. A. Gillies, B.A.^ Arnprior, Ont. 

J. E. McAskill, M.D.,C.M.^ Watertown, N.Y. 

J. M. Macdonnell, M.C., M.A., LL.D., K.C., M.P.^ Toronto, Ont. 

A. G. MacLachlan, B.Sc.^ Kingston, Ont. 

W. E. McNeill, M.A., Ph.D., D.C.L., LL.D., F.R.S.C.^ Kingston, Ont. 

W. A. Newman, B.Sc.^ Montreal, Que. 

Mrs. James Richardson^ Winnipeg, Man. 

Retire 1951 

Elmer Davis, Esq.^ Kingston, Ont. 

A. J. Meiklejohn, B.A.® Kingston, Ont. 

D. K. MacTavish, B.A., K.C.^ Ottawa, Ont. 

^Elected by the University Council for three years. 

^Elected by the Benefactors for four years. 

^Elected by the Graduates for three years. 

^Elected by the Board of Trustees to represent the Faculty of Applied 
Science for three years. 

^Appointed by the Governing Board of Queen’s Theological College for 
one year. 

^Elected by the Board of Trustees for four years. 

’'Elected by Benefactors to represent the Faculty of Applied Science 
for three years. 


— 17 — 


THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 


Secretary 

Gordon J. Smith, B.A., B.Sc. 

Ex-officio Members 
The Chancellor 
The Principal 

The Members op the Board of Trustees 
The Members of the Senate 

Elective Members 
Retire 19^8 

James Bartlett, B.Sc Ottawa, Ont. 

C. H. Bland, B.A Ottawa, Ont. 

*His Honour Judge C. A. Cameron, B.A. Belleville, Ont. 

Mrs. F. C. Casselman, B.A Edmonton, Alta. 

Mrs. D. M. Chown, B.A Kingston, Ont. 

Rev. A. D. Cornett, M.A., D.D Oshawa, Ont. 

D. G. Geiger, B.Sc Toronto, Ont. 

J. A. Polson, M.D.jC.M. Bronxville, N.Y. 

G. J. Smith, B.A., B.Sc Kingston, Ont. 

Retire 19^9 

G. C. Bateman, C.M.G., O.B.E., B.Sc., LL.D Montreal, Qne. 

J. A. Bell, B.Sc Toronto, Ont. 

W. G. Cornett, B.A., M.D., C.M Hamilton, Ont. 

J. J. Dunlop, B.A Ottawa, Ont. 

J. Y. MacKinnon, M.A., B.D., Ph.D. London, Ont. 

N. B. MacRostie, B.A., B.Sc Ottawa, Ont. 

J. L. Murray, B.A Kingston, Ont. 

Mrs. T. a. Neivlands, M.A Kingston, Ont. 

Miss Mary E. White, M.A Toronto, Ont. 

Retire 1950 

Mrs. D. W. Boucher, B.A. Kingston, Ont. 

C. W. Drury, B.Sc., Ph.D Toronto, Ont. 

D. D. Findlay, B.Sc. Carleton Place, Ont. 

*J. C. Macfarlane, M.A., K.C Toronto, Ont. 

B. R. MacKay, B.Sc., Ph.D Ottawa, Ont. 

W. A. Newman, B.Sc Montreal, Que. 

W. P. E. Paterson, M.D.,C.M Ottawa, Ont. 

C. M. Scott, B.A., M.D.,C.M Peterborough, Ont. 

E. T. Sterne, B.Sc Brantford, Ont. 


— 18 — 


Retire 1951 


R. W. Anglin, M.A Toronto, Ont. 

T. H. Farrell, M.A., Utica, N.Y. 

D. E. Keeley, B.Sc. Schumacher, Ont. 

*D. H. Laird, M.A., LL.D., K.C Winnipeg, Man. 

*J. E. McAskill, M.D.jC.M Watertown, N.Y. 

Miss Mary McCallum, M.A Smiths Falls, Ont. 

E. M. Patton, B.Com Montreal, Que. 

Miss Anne H. Sedgewick, M.A Ottawa, Ont. 

C. D. Wight, B.Sc. Ottawa, Ont. 

Retire 1952 

*H. G. Bertram, B.Sc Dundas, Ont. 

C. R. Booth, B.Sc. Ottawa, Ont. 

H. T. Ewart, B.A., M.D.,C.M Hamilton, Ont. 

Francis King, M.A., LL.D., K.C Kingston, Ont 

E. L. Longmore, B.Sc Timmins, Ont. 

L. A. Pierce, B.A., S.T.D., LL.D., Litt.D Toronto, Ont. 

S. M. PoLSON, M.A., M.D.,C.M Kingston, Ont. 

JAMES Wallace, M.A., B.D., M.D.,C.M Renfrew, Ont. 

R. M. Winter, M.B.E., M.A Toronto, Ont. 

Retire 1953 

O. E. Ault, B.A., B.Paed., Ph.D Ottawa, Ont. 

M. J. Aykroyd, B.Sc Toronto, Ont. 

A. F. G. Cadenhead, B.A., D.Sc Shawinigan Falls, Que. 

Mrs. R. B. Crummy, B.A Vancouver, B.C. 

Miss Florence S. Dunlop, M.A., Ph.D Ottawa, Ont. 

J. F. Houston, M.D,,C.M Hamilton, Ont. 

*A. G. MacLachlan, B.Sc. Kingston, Ont. 

G. C. Monture, B.Sc Ottawa, Ont. 

Wallace Troup, M.D.,C.M - Ottawa, Ont. 

♦Representative of the Council on the Board of Trustees. 


— 19 — 


THE SENATE 


Ex-officio Members 

' Robert C. Wallace, C.M.G., M.A., D.Sc., Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., F.G.S., 

F.R.S.C, Principal 

W. A. Mackintosh, C.M.G., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., F.R.S.C., 

Vice-Principal and Dean of the Faculty of Arts 
D. S. Ellis, D.S.O., B.Sc., M.A., M.C.E., 

Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science 

G. S. Melvin, M.D. Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 

Rev. H. a. Kent, E.D., M.A., D.D., F.R.S.A., F.A.G.S., Principal of 

Queen’s Theoogical College 

Elective Members 
The Faculty of Arts 

H. Henel, Ph.D. Retires 1948 

J. A. CORRY, LL.B., B.C.L., LL.M., F.R.S.C Retires 1949 

R. G. Trotter, M.A., Ph.D., D.C.L, F.R.Hist.S., F.R.S.C Retires 1950 

The Faculty of Applied Science 


D. M. JEMMETT, D.C.M., B.Sc., M.A Retires 1948 

R. L. Dorrance, M.A., F.C.I.C Retires 1949 

H. W. Harkness, M Sc., Ph.D Retires 1950 


The Faculty of Medicine 

D. L. C. Bingham, M.B., Ch.B., F.R.C.S. (Sdin.) Retires 1948 

E M. Rorertson, M.B., Ch.B., F.R.C.O.G., F.R.C.S. (Edin.) Retires 1949 
W. A. Jones, M.D., F.R.C.P.(C), F.F.R. (Lond.) Retires 1950 

The Faculty of Queen's Theological College 


Rev. J. M. Shaw, M.A., D.D. Retires 1948 

Rev. S. M. Gilmour, B.D., Ph.D Retires 1948 


CURATORS OF THE LIBRARY 

Principal Wallace, Principal Kent, Dr. W. E. McNeill, Vice- 
Principal Mackintosh, Dean Ellis, Dean Melvin, the Registrar. 
Professors J. A. Corry, J. K. Robertson, C. H. McCuaig and 
C. J. Vincent. 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 
G. W. Mylks, M.D., F.A.C.S., F.R.C.S. (C), 

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 
W. T. Connell, M.D., F.R.C.P.(C), 

Professor of Medicine and Clinical Medicine 
F. Etherington, C.M.G., M.D.,C.M., F.R.S.C. (C), 

Professor of Surgery 


— 20 — 


OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 


G. Spencer Melvin, M.D. (Aberdeen), 

Professor of Physiology and Dean of the Faculty 

127 King Street West 


H. S. Angrove, M.D.,C.M., 

Lecturer in Anaesthesiology 

LaSalle Hotel 

H. L. Batstone, B.Com., M.D.,C.M., 

Clinical Assistant 

G. C. Beacock, M.D., C.M., 

Clinical Assistant in Medicine 

Ontario Hospital 

N. E. Berry, M.D.,C.M., 

Professor of Urology 

Ontario Hospital 


119 Queen’s Crescent 

D. L. C. Bingham, M.B., Ch.B., F.R.C.S.(Edin.),F.R,C.S.(C), 

Professor of Surgery 


H. G. Bird, M.B., M.R.C.P. (Bond.), 

Clinical Assistant in Medicine 

22 Barrie Street. 


Gananoque, Ontario 

D. W. Boucher, M.D., C.M., F.R.C.S. (Edin.), 

Associate Professor of Surgery 

A. R. J. Boyd, B.A., M.D.,C.M., D.P.H., 

Lecturer in Preventive Medicine 

Hill Street 

Eldon M. Boyd, M.A., M.D.,C.M., 

Professor of Pharmacology 

220 Queen Street 


211 Union Street West 

G. Malcolm Brown, M.D.,C.M., D.Phil.Oxon, M.R.C.P.(Lond.), 
F.R.C.P.(C), 


Associate Professor of Medicine 

504 Johnson Street 


R. C. Burr, M.D., C.M., F.R.C.S.(Edin.), 

Assistant Professor of Radiology and Physical Therapy 

Annandale Apts. 


H. M. Campbell, M.D.,C.M., 

141 King Street East 


- 21 — 


W. A. Campbell, M.D., C.M., 


Lecturer in Anaesthesiology 

F. A. Cays, M.D.,C.M., F.R.C.S.(C), 

Professor of Oto-laryngology 

150 Clergy Street 


124 Wellington Street 

L. R. Clow, M.D.,C.M., 

Clinical Tutor in Obstetrics 

221 King Street East 


W. Ford Connell, M.R.C.P. (Lond.), F.R.C.P.(C), F.A.C.P., 

Professor of Medicine and Clinical Medicine 



11 Arch Street 

H. Wesley Curran, M.A., Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

J. S. Delahaye, M.D., C.M., 

Lecturer in Pediatrics 

469 Earl Street 


305 King Street West 

John Edwards, B.A., 

Instructor in Physical Training 

74 Barrie Street. 

J. M. Edworthy, M.D. (Western), 

Clinical Assistant in Medicine 

26 Park Street 


G. H. Ettinger, B.A., M.D.,C.M., F.R.S.C, 

Professor of Physiology 



67 Queen’s Crescent 

J. E. Gibson, B.A., M.D.,C.M., 

Clinical Assistant in Medicine 

W. D. Hay, M.A., M.D.,C.M., 

Associate Professor of Pathology 

85 L. William Street 

John D. Hamilton, M.D. (Toronto), 

Professor of Pathology 

124 Beverly Street 

Helen M. Holden, M.D. (Toronto), 

Clinical Assistant in Medicine 

320 Mack Street 

Bruce H. Hopkins, M.B. (Toronto), 

Assistant Professor of Medicine 

— 22— 

95 King Street East 


S. W. Houston, M.D.,C.M., F.R.C.S.(Edin.) , F.R.C.S.(C), 

Associate Professor of Surgery 

64 College Street 

W. A. Jones, O.B.E.., M.D. (Western), F.R.C.P.(C), F.F.R., 

Professor of Radiology and Physical Therapy 

251 University Avenue 


Basil M. Roster, M.D.,C.M. (McGill) , 

Lecturer in Surgery 

7 Union Street West 

Benjamin Kropp, A.M., Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Embryology 

126 Union Street 

G. C. Lindsay, M.D.,C.M., 

Clinical Assistant in Surgery 

461 Princess Street 

J. I. Lodge, B.A., 

Instructor in Physics 

J. F. Logan, M.A., Ph.D., 

50 Wellington Street 


Associate Professor of Chemistry 

184 Union Street West 

C. H. McCuaig, M.D.,C.M., 

Professor and Head of the Department of Psychiatry 

96 Queen's Crescent 


P. M. Macdonnell, M.A., M.D.,C.M. 

Lecturer in Medical Jurisprudence 

Douglas McEwen, M.A., Ph.D. (Rochester) , 

Associate Professor of Pharacology 

94 Sydenham Street 

R. R. MacGregor, M.D.,C.M., F.R.C.P.(C), 
Professor of Pediatrics 

148 Earl Street 


P. A. McLeod, B.A., M.D., C.M., M.R.C.O.G., 

Associate Professor of Gynaecology and Obstetrics 

191 King Street 


D. C. Matheson, M.B., 

Professor of Anatomy 

46 Sydenham Street 


A. D. Milligan, M.D.,C.M., 

Clinical Assistant in Anaesthesiology 

368 Albert Street, 


— 23 — 


Gordon Mylks, B.A., M.D.,C.M., F.A.C.S., 

Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 

122 Wellin^on Street 


F. D. O’Connor, 

Clinical Assistant in Medicine 


F. J. O’Connor, M.D., C.M., 

Assistant Professor of Obstetrics 


176 Johnson Street 


193 Earl Street 


F. X. O’Connor, M.D.,C.M., 

Clinical Assistant in Ophthalmology and Oto-laryngology 

263V2 King Street 


Maurice J. O’Connor, M.D.,C.M., 

Clinical Assistant in Psychiatry 


197 Victoria Street 


John H. Orr, M.D.,C.M., F.R.C.P.(C), 

Professor of Bacteriology and Secretary of the Faculty, 

529 Johnson Street 


T. J. Rigney, B.A., K.C., City Solicitor, 

Lecturer in Medical Jurisprudence 

89 Clarence Street 

G. B. Reed, O.B.E., M.A., B.Sc., Ph.D. (Harvard) , F.R.S.C., 

Professor of Bacteriology 

218 Albert Street 


Edwin M. Robertson, M.B., Ch.B.(Edin.), F.R.C.O.G., F.R.C.S.(Edin.), 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 

315 King Street West 


J. K. Robertson, M.A.( Toronto), F.R.S.C., 
Professor of Physics 


105 Albert Street 


S. Robinson, M.D., C.M., 

Lecturer in Medicine 

Marion Ross, B.A., 

Instructor' in Physical Training 

J. A. Roy, M.A. (Edin.), 

Professor of English 

M. E. M. Sawyer, M.A., Ph.D. (McGill), 
Lecturer in Physiology 


301 Brock Street 


229 Nelson Street. 


185 L. William Street 


142 Albert Street 


- 24 — 


G. D. Scott, M.D.,C.M., 

Clinical Assistant in Medicine 


87 King Street East 


R. G. Sinclair, B.A., Ph.D. (Rochester) , F.R.S.C., 

The Craine Professor of Biochemistry 


Collins Bay 


M. W. M. Sloanf, M.D.,C.M., M.S. (Michigan) , 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

106 Wellington Street 


W. M. Smith, B.Sc., Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

132 University Avenue 


H. D. Steele, M.D.,C.M., 

Surgical Registrar 

J. S. Stewart, M.D.,C.M., 

Lecturer in Psychiatry 


Kingston General Hospital 


Ontario Hospital. 


J. T. Tweddell, M.D.,C.M., 

Lecturer in Medicine, Assistant Curator of Pathological 
Museum 

113 Wellington Street 


T. N. Tweddell, M.D.,C.M., 

Clinical Assistant in Surgical Pathology, Assistant 
Curator of Pathological Museum 

287 Victoria Street 


E. P. White, M.D.,C.M., F.R.C.S.(Edin.) 

Clinical Assistant in Urology 


221 King Street East 


John Wyllie, M.A., M.D., B.Sc. (Glasgow), D.P.H.(Canib.), 

The Arthur R. Elliott Professor of Public Health and 
Preventive Medicine 


53 Kensington Avenue 


— 25 — 


EQUIPMENT AND SPECIAL FACILITIES 


THE MEDICAL BUILDINGS 

The Old Medical Building, erected in 1858, was destroyed by fire in 
August, 1924. It has been replaced by a fire-proof structure which 
houses the departments of Anatomy and Preventive Medicine. 

In the Medical Laboratories building are conducted the courses in 
Bacteriology, Embryology, Histology, and Physiology. 

The department of Pathology is housed in the Richardson Labora- 
tory, attached to the Clinic building. General Hospital. 

The Craine Building houses the three departments of Biochemistry, 
Pharmacology, and Obstetrics. 

THE LABORATORIES 

THE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORIES 

The classes in the Department of Biology are conducted in new 
quarters in the Old Arts building. The laboratories are provided with 
the supplies and equipment necessary for the study of plant and animal 
life and are provided with a separate locker for each student. 

The laboratories in Bacteriology are situated on the second and 
third floors of the Medical Laboratories building; that for Experimental 
Physiology occupies the west side of the second floor of the building 
and has all appliances necessary for 50 students working at one time. 
The work in Histology and Embryology is conducted on the west side 
of the first floor, where there is accommodation for 120 students. 

THE CHEMICAL LABORATORIES 

The Chemical Laboratories are in Gordon Hall. On the fourth 
floor are the laboratories of Medical Organic and Water Analysis. On 
the third floor are tv/o laboratories for General Chemistry, and a labora- 
tory for Electrochemistry and Colloid Chemistry. On the second or 
main floor are two laboratories for Quantitative Analysis, two for Or- 
ganic Chemistry, and one for Industrial Chemistry. On the first or 
basement floor are three laboratories for Qualitative Analysis, and two 
for Physical Chemistry. Besides these there are a number of small 
separate laboratories for research work. The Biochemistry laboratory 
is in the Craine Building. 


— 26 — 


THE PHYSICAL LABORATORIES 

The Physics Laboratories occupy the major part of Ontario Hali. 
The basement contains the large elementary laboratory, the liquid air 
room, numerous research laboratories and the research workshop. The 
main floor is given over to undergraduate lecture and laboratory rooms. 
The second floor has two large lecture rooms, laboratory room for ad- 
vanced undergraduate classes and for research. The attic is used for 
workshop and storage purposes. 


THE HOSPITALS 

The General Hospital is the centre for clinical teaching and all 
members of its staff are nominated by the Medical Faculty. The Doug- 
las Building houses the Public Wards, Operating Theatres, X-ray, 
Radio-therapy and Electro-therapeutic departments and various out- 
patient services. The Nickle Wing is occupied by the Obstetrical de- 
partment and the Doran Wing is the Children’s Hospital. The Isolation 
Hospital forms part of the General Hospital group and is under its 
administration. Sixty-four patients can be accommodated and at pre- 
sent one-half of the available accommodation is set aside for Tuber- 
culosis. This Hospital affords full opportunity for clinical teaching in 
infectious diseases including Tuberculosis. 

In the Hotel Dieu Hospital certain public wards are used for clinical 
teaching by members of its staff nominated by the Medical Faculty. 

The Ontario Hospital for Mental Diseases is open for clinical in- 
struction. Its staff are responsible for the teaching of mental diseases. Its 
large population affords much material for medical, surgical, gynaeco- 
logical and pathological teaching by members of staff of the Medical 
Faculty. 

Internships in the above hospitals are available to members of the 
final year on graduation. Applications should be made directly to the 
superintendent of the hospital concerned. 

ONTARIO CANCER FOUNDATION, KINGSTON CLINIC 

The Ontario Cancer Foundation, Kingston Clinic for the Diagnosis 
and Treatment of Cancer and Allied Diseases, is operated by the Ontario 
Cancer Foundation, which was established by the Ontario Government 
in 1943. The funds of the Foundation were supplied partly by the Pro- 
vincial Government but the greatest amount came from public sub- 
scription. It is situated in the ground floor, Victory Wing of the Kings- 
ton General Hospital. The Clinic Staff, who are employed part time, 
are Officers of Instruction of the Medical Faculty of the University. The 
policy of the Foundation is to encourage the use of this clinic for the 
teaching of the students at Queen’s University. 


—- 27 — 


While this is not a free clinic, the assistance through public sub- 
scription has made it possible to carry on the work at a much less 
charge to the patient than would ordinarily be the case, and if condi- 
tions warrant it no charge is made. 

Facilities for treatment include all branches of surgery. This work 
is done for the most part in the Kingston General Hospital. For irradi- 
ation therapy there are available 590 mgms. radium, radon from the 
Ontario Department of Health and x-ray therapy with 100 K.V., 200 
K.V. and 400 K.V. All types of radiotherapy are carried out in the 
Clinic. 


THE LIBRARY 

The Douglas Library building provides a large reading room, 
an art room and a reserve book room. It also houses the Lome Pierce 
Collection, the McNicol Collection of material on telegraphy, etc., and 
a large collection of maps. 

In the reading room about 5,000 volumes of general reference works 
are on open shelves. The main collection on five tiers of book stacks 
occupies the centre of the building. The total number of volumes in 
the central and departmental libraries is in excess of 200,000. 

The system of classification used is that of the library of Congress. 

In addition to the general library ( there are departmental libraries 
for physics, chemistry, mining and metallurgy; geology and mineralogy; 
civil, mechanical and electrical engineering; clinical medicine; biology; 
ophthalmology ; pathology. 

The Lome Pierce Collection of Canadian Literature is very rich in 
first editions, original manuscripts and rare Canadiana. A catalogue 
is in course of publication. 

The Shortt-Haydon Collection of portraits and views relating to 
Canada is one of the finest collections of its kind. 

The library of the Medical Faculty is now located in the Old Arts 
Building, and has its own reading room. It' is administered by the staff 
of the general library. 

The John Franklin Kidd Endowment provides for an annual fund 
for the purchase of books in the department of Surgery. These volumes 
are marked by a special book plate and form a valuable section of the 
Library gradually increasing in importance. 


— 28 — 


THE MUSIC ROOM 


The Music Room in the Douglas Library is ideally furnished and 
equipped for music study and listening. It houses the Carnegie col- 
lection ©f more than a thousand gramophone records, and a number 
of musical scores and books which are available on loan through the 
usual library facilities. The equipment also includes a Steinway grand 
pianoforte, a radio-phonograph, and a high-fidelity phonograph with 
separate loud-speaker console. The room is open every afternoon dur- 
ing the session, including Saturday and Sunday. 

THE UNIVERSITY CONCERT SERIES 

The University Concert Series is available to students for $3 for 
the season. The programme for session 1946-47 was as follows: the 
Trapp Family; Luboshutz and Nemenoff, Pianists; Garbusova, Cellist; 
and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. 

The series for 1947-48 includes Mack Harrel, Baritone; Joseph 
Szigeti, Violinist; Nikita Magaloff, Pianist; and the Baltimore Symphony 
Orchestra. 

In addition there is The Young Artists’ Series including the Con- 
servatory String Quartette; Pincusoff and Pizzolongo, Clarinetist and 
Pianist; the Winner of the Singing Stars of Tomorrow Contest. The 
cost of The Young Artists’ Series is 50 cents for students, $1.00 for 
other subscribers. 


— 29 — 


GENERAL INFORMATION 


ADMISSION OF STUDENTS 

The number of students admitted to the classes of the first year is 
limited and prospective matriculants should make formal application 
for admission on forms obtainable from the Secretary of the Faculty. 
These applications should be in the hands of the Secretary not later 
than August 16th. Applicants will be notified of the decision of the 
Committee on Admissions as soon as possible after that date. Only 
under special circumstances will applications be considered after 
August 16th. 

Matriculation requirements must be completed before an application 
can be considered. 

All Ontario candidates for admission must satisfy the following 
Matriculation requirements : 

(1) Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma (Pass Ma- 
triculation) . 

(2) Ontario Grade XIII (Honour Matriculation). 

A minimum of eight papers, including the following: 

English (Literature and Composition). 

Mathematics (two of Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry). 

Language — one of: 

Latin (Authors and Composition). 

Greek (Authors and Composition). 

French (Authors and Composition). 

German (Authors and Composition). 

Italian (Authors and Composition). 

Spanish (Authors and Composition). 

Chemistry (one paper). 

Physics (one paper). 

Ex-service men will be eligible for admission to first year Medicine 
with the following standing: 

1. General education — minimum: 

Senior Matriculation in English 

Junior Matriculation in another language (Latin advised) and 

in History; or, alternatively. Senior Matriculation in either of 

these two subjects. 

2. Pre-requisites for later work: 

Senior Matriculation in Mathematics (two of Algebra, 
Geometry, Trigonometry), in Physics and in Chemistry. 


— 30 — 


A student may offer in substitution for Grade XIII first year work 
in the above subjects in the Faculty of Arts, provided that he holds a 
Secondary School Graduation Diploma. A six-year medical course must 
follow such registration. 

The Faculty of Medicine limits first year registration to forty-five 
students. A selection from applicants for admission will be made on the 
basis of their qualifications. 

A candidate entering with Grade XIII who, in the course of 
two years in a Faculty of Arts, has obtained credit for Physics 1, 
Biology 1 and 16, Chemistry 1, 2, 10 and 12, may be admitted to the second 
year of Medicine. The course in Medicine may thus be completed in 
five years instead of six. 

Candidates from Provinces of Canada other than Ontario must pre- 
sent certificates of a standard equivalent to that required for students 
from the Province of Ontario. 

Intending students are reminded that a University degree in Medi- 
cine does not in itself confer the right to practise the profession of 
medicine. In each Province of Canada and in each one of the United 
States the right of licensure is vested in a Licensing Body which has its 
special laws and requirements. In many cases a special standard of gen- 
eral education is insisted upon before beginning the study of medicine. 
In order that disappointment and loss of time may be avoided, the 
University requires students to register with the licensing body of their 
home Province or State before beginning their medical course. 

Full information as to the requirements for registration in the 
various provinces may be obtained from the Registrars of the Provincial 
Medical Boards (see pages 53, 54). 

Prospective matriculants musr submit with their applications for 
admission the certificates on which they claim standing. 

Certificates of Matriculation in any University may be accepted 
pro tanto at the discretion of the Faculty. 


VACCINATION 

Candidates for admission to all faculties must submit a certificate 
of successful vaccination with application. 


MATRICULATION EXAMINATIONS 

The Matriculation examinations are conducted for the Universities 
of Ontario by the University Matriculation Board. They are held in 


— 31 — 


June of each year at the Universities and at each High School and Col- 
legiate Institute in Ontario and at such other centres as may be ap- 
proved by the Board. 

The Secretary of the University Matriculation Board, J. P. 
Cowles, Esq., Parliament Buildings, Toronto, will furnish, on request, the 
official circular which contains full information concerning dates, fees, 
standards, curriculum, and examination centres. The University also 
publishes an announcement containing all particulars regarding Ma- 
triculation, which may be obtained from the Registrar of the University. 


REGISTRATION 

Students should register on the day set for such registration in the 
diary on page 5. 


FRATERNITIES 

By resolution of Senate no student registered with the University 
may form or become a member of any chapter of an externally-affiliated 
fraternity or sorority at or near Kingston. 


CURRICULUM 

Candidates for the degrees of M.D.,C.M. must complete a period 
of six years’ study. Student's entering before September, 1944 are 
enrolled in the course comprised of six intramural sessions of eight 
months each. Those entering in September, 1947, will register in the 
new course, consisting of five intramural sessions and one clinical year 
to be spent in a hospital designated by the University. 

Attendance on full courses of instruction is required in the following 
subjects of study: 

1st Year (new course) : — General Biology, General Chemistry, 
Organic Chemistry, Physics, English. 

2nd Year (new course) : — Anatomy, Biochemistry, Histology, Em- 
bryology, Physics, Psychology. 

3rd Year (new course): — Anatomy, Physiology, Pharmacology, 
Bacteriology, Psychopathology, Medical Statistics. 

4th Year (new course) : — Pathology, Pharmacology, Surgical 
Anatomy, Surgery, Medicine, Preventive Medicine, Psychopathology, 
Jurisprudence, Radiology. 


5th Year (old course) — Surgery, Medicine (including Thera- 
peutics), Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Pathology, Eye, Ear, Nose and 
Throat, Pediatrics, Jurisprudence, Psychiatry, Radiology and Physical 
Therapy, Parasitology, Anaesthesiology, Urology, Preventive Medicine. 

Certificates of attendance on lectures may be accepted from incor- 
porated medical schools in the British Dominions and others recognized 
by British Universities and licensing bodies. Other certificates of at- 
tendance on lectures and examinations may be accepted at the discre- 
tion of the Faculty. 

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADUATION 

Students in the first three years must attend a minimum of 90 per 
cent., and students in other years a minimum of 80 per cent., of the 
lectures and laboratory exercises in the subjects for which they are 
registered to be admitted to the final examinations in those subjects. 

The Faculty may at any time either during the term or after the 
close of the term, require any student to withdraw from the Faculty 
of Medicine whose conduct, attendance, work or progress is deemed 
unsatisfactory. 

The examination marks are arranged in the following grades: 
A =80 to 100%, B=70 to 79%, C=60 to 69%, D= under 60%, failure. 
A student must have obtained pass standing (60%) in all the examina- 
tions of any year before proceeding to the higher year. Pass standing 
may be obtained at the regular spring examinations, or at the supple- 
mental examinations. 

Supplementals 

Permission to write supplemental examinations may be granted to 
any student who has failed in no more than 50% of the examinations 
of the first, second or third year, or in no more than three examinations 
of any succeeding year. 

(a) Except in the case of the first year, a student who fails at the sup- 
plemental examinations will be permitted to repeat his year unless other- 
wise conditioned. No student will be permitted to repeat more than 
one year. 

(b) A student of the third year who fails in more than 50% of the 
spring examinations, and of the fourth, fifth and sixth years who fails 
in more than three examinations may be permitted to repeat his year. 

Withdrawal 

(a) A student of the first or second year who fails in more than 
50% of his spring examinations will be required to withdraw. 

(b) A student of the third year who fails in more than 50% on 
the spring examinations and who has written a total of three or more 
supplementals in his first two years will be required to withdraw. 


— 33 — 


(c) A student who repeats his year and fails will be required to 
withdraw. 

(d) A student who has successfully repeated a year, but fails to 
get his standing in any subsequent year, will be required to withdraw. 

A candidate will not be admitted to an examination unless he has 
paid all University fees. 


Examinations 


Examinations are required at the end of every session as follows: 

At the end of the first session (new course) : — 

General Biology, General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Physics, 
English. 

At the end of the second session (new course) : — 

Anatomy, Biochemistry, Physics, Histology, Embryology, Psychology. 

At the end of the third session new course: — 

Anatomy, Physiology, Pharmacology, Bacteriology, Psychopatho- 
logy, Medical Statistics. 

At the end of the fourth session (new course) : — 

Pathology, Pharmacology (including Materia Medica), Applied 
Anatomy, Surgery, Medicine, Preventive Medicine, Psychopathology, 
Jurisprudence, Radiology. 

At the end of the fifth session (old course) : — 

Surgery, Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Pathology, Pedia- 
trics, Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat, Jurisprudence, Psychiatry, Radiology, 
Parasitology, Ansesthesiolcgy, Preventive Medicine, Urology. 

Equivalent Examinations 

The following courses and examinations in Arts will be accepted in 
Medicine: — 


Arts 


Medicine 


1. Courses and examinations in 
Biology 1 and 16. 


1. Course and examination in 
first year General Biology. 


2. Courses and examinations in 
Chemistry 1, 2, 10 and 12. 


2. Courses and examinations in 
first year Chemistry. 


3. Course and examination in 
Physics 2. 


3. Attendance on Lectures until 
Christmas, in second year Physics. 


— 34 — 


The courses in Chemistry and Physics must be taken in the Univer- 
sity; the classes will not be allowed to holders of certificates of Honour 
Matriculation. 


FEES 
First Year 

Sessional fee (including Registration, Tuition, Examinations, 

Library, Laboratory fees, and Degree fee) $ 200.00 

Student interests (including Health Insurance, Athletics, Alma 
Mater Society, “Queen’s Journal”, Aesculapian Society, and 
■ Union) 23.00 

Sessional Laboratory Deposit 20.00 


Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Years 

Sessional fee (including Registration, Tuition, Examinations, 

Library, Laboratory fees, Degree fee and Student interests) 245.00 


Sessional Laboratory deposit (each year) 10.00 

Special Fees, payable when incurred: 

Late Registration - 3.00 

Supplemental examination in one subject 10.00 

Each additional subject 2.00 


Degree of Master of Science in Medicine (see p. 41). 

Diploma of Public Health (see p. 41). 

Diploma in Medical Radiology (see p. 42) 

Extra Fee for Degree in Absentia - 10.00 

Pro tanto fee 10.00 

Remit funds by accepted cheque, postal order, or bank draft, pay- 
able to Queen’s University. Cheques or bank drafts on any point where 
there is a branch of the Bank of Montreal will be received at par; all 
other cheques should have Vs of 1%, minimum 15c, added to cover ex- 
change, or drawn plus exchange. 

Payment of Fees 

In the case of the First Year fees may be paid in two equal in- 
stalments, in which case an additional $5.00 will be added to the first 


— 35 — 


instalment. This first instalment and the laboratory deposit must be 
paid at the time of registration, and the balance paid on or before 
January 6th, 1947. No student will be admitted to classes until the 
above conditions have been complied with, nor will he be permitted to 
continue the work of the second term until the fees have been paid in 
full. 

In the case of other years, fees may be paid according to one of 
the following three plans: 

(1) In full during the first week. 

(2) On payment of an additional $5.00, in two halves, the first payment 
including the $5.00 to be made during the first week, and the 
second by the beginning of the second term. 

(3) Those who find it impossible to comply with either of the above 
plans may make special arrangements direct with the Treasurer. 


BOARD AND ROOM 

During the session 1946-47 students have paid from S6.50 to $7.00 
a week for board, and $3.50 to $4.00 for room, so that satisfactory board 
and lodging may be obtained at from $10.00 to $11.00 per week. Lists of 
boarding and lodging houses may be obtained from the Housing Office. 


MICROSCOPES 

. Every student entering the Faculty of Medicine will be required 
to have, at the commencement of his studies, a first-class microscope of 
approved design. Such an instrument is an essential part of the 
equipment of a practitioner of medicine. 

The Faculty of Medicine have made arrangements whereby such in- 
struments can be purchased at a low price, either for cash at cost or 
by three equal annual payments which include carrying charges. In 


— 36 — 


the latter case the microscope is retained by the University during 
vacations until payment is completed. In recent years the cost for out- 
right purchase has been approximately $200.00. 


Further information regarding the microscopes and methods of 
payment may be obtained from the Secretary of the Faculty of Medi- 
cine. 

PHYSICAL WELFARE OF STUDENTS 

All students admitted must produce evidence of successful vaccina- 
tion. 


Every student is required upon registration to contribute $4 to- 
wards a health insurance fund. In return the student has the free 
services of the University Medical Officer and a special Hospital rate 
of 50 cents a day. Details of the plan are given in a printed leaflet 
which may be had on request. 

Each first year student is given a physical examination by the 
University physician, and corrective exercises in the Gymnasium are 
prescribed when they are needed. Gymnasium work for two hours each 
week is required of all first year students unless excused by the Medical 
Officer or on account of military training. 


Tuberculin Tests 

Tuberculin tests will be given to all students entering Queen’s 
University for the first time. This service will be free of charge but 
fhose who react positively must have an X-ray examination at their 
own cost. 


— 37 — 


Athletics 


As a member of the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union, 
Queen’s gives every opportunity for students to compete in intercollegi- 
ate athletics on some of the many teams representing the University, 
while the student who is unable to find a place on a University team 
has the chance to play in inter-year and inter-faculty games. 

Each student pays an Athletic Fee of $5.00, which is collected with 
the sessional fee and paid to the Athletic Board of Control, by whom 
all athletic activities, the rink, the playing fields and the gymnasium are 
controlled. 

During the summer of 1921, through the generosity of the late Dr. 
James Richardson, of Winnipeg, a graduate in Arts and formerly Chan- 
cellor of the University, the George Richardson Memorial Stadium was 
built on the Union Street Campus. The grand stand and bleachers 
accommodate about 7,000 spectators. 

The Jock Harty Arena, built in 1921, was destroyed by fire in the 
spring of 1924. It was rebuilt on the same site during the summer, 
and is equipped with an artificial ice plant. 


STUDENT ADVISERS 

In order to assist students in general methods of study and in the 
solution of personal and class problems, a student adviser has been 
appointed for the first year. 


Adviser for the year 1947-48 — Professor J. K. Robertson. 

i 


THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY 

Queen’s was the first University in Canada to introduce Student 
Government. All students are members of the Alma Mater Society, the 
chief instrument of student government, and are expected to share in 
its duties and responsibilities. 

— 38 — 


ALMA MATER SOCIETY LECTURE 

In 1939, as a contribution from the student body to the Centenary 
Endowment Fund, the Alma Mater Society gave the University its ac- 
cumulated reserve of $1,711. The income will be used to provide an 
annual lecture to be known as the Alma Mater Society Lecture. 


THE AESCULAPIAN SOCIETY 


All students registered in the Faculty of Medicine are members of 
the Aesculapian Society, and amenable to its rules and regulations. 


Office Bearers 

Honorary President 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Assistant Secretary 

Treasurer 

Athletic Stick 

Senior A.M.S. Representative 

Junior A.M.S. Representative 

G.A.M.S.I. Representative 

Permanent Secretary-Treasurer 


Dr. John Wyllie 

W. C. Wedlock 

J. S. McAuley 

G. J. Mack 

L. E. Ross 

L. C. Guest 

D. T. Smylie 

K. G. Phin 

S. Segal 

Helen L. Martin 

Dr. Eldon M. Boyd 


MILITARY SERVICES 


University Naval Training Division 

The University Naval Training Division, Queen^s University, was 
organized in March 1943, under the direction of Lieutenant S. T. Hill, 
Commanding Officer H.M.C.S. “Cataraqui”. 

A minimum of 110 hours’ training will be given during the aca- 
demic year, and two weeks’ spring training in H.M.C.S. “Cornwallis” or 
H.M.C.S. “Naden” at the end of the academic year. 

Under-graduates in science or non-science courses will be enrolled 
as ratings on Divisional ' Strength. Students in mechanical, electrical 
engineering and engineering physics courses will be enrolled as Stok- 


— 39 — 


ers II. Students in other University courses, except Medicine, will be 
enrolled as Ordinary Seamen. Students who fail to pass the medical 
examination for Ordinary Seamen may be considered for other rates 
still being recruited. 

Canadian Officers' Training Corps 
The Queen’s University Contingent of the C.O.T.C., formed at the 
outbreak of the last war under Lieutenant-Colonel A. B. Cunningham, 
was organized as a Unit of the Militia in February, 1915. Reorganized 
after the war by Colonel A. Macphail, C.M.G., D.S.O., it is now com- 
manded by Lieut.-Col. E. A. Walker. 

Basic military training is provided for students in all faculties of 
the University. 

American Legion Scholarship 
Value $100. Established by Dr. George Hasmnga of New York. 

To be awarded annually to a student officer of the Queen’s Univer- 
sity Contingent of the Canadian Officers’ Training Corps, the selection 
to be made by the Joint Services University Training Committee from 
a group nominated by the Commanding Officer. In determining the 
award academic standing will be taken into consideration. 

C.O.T.C. Scholarship 

Value $100. Maintained by the regimental funds of the Queen’s 
University Contingent of the Canadian Officers’ Training Corps. To 
be awarded annually to a member of the Contingent who is not an 
officer. The selection will be made by the Joint Services University 
Training Committee from a group recommended by the Commanding 
Officer. In determining the award academic standing will be taken 
into consideration. 


HIGHER DEGREES 


A standing committee on Medical graduate studies consisting of the 
Principal, the Dean, the Secretary and four members of the staff of the 
Medical Faculty shall consider all applications for graduate degrees 
in Medicine and shall report to the University Committee on Graduate 
Studies on the fitness of the candidate to enter a graduate course and 
recommend to the above Committee the prescribed programme of work. 

THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MEDICINE 
Prerequisite: A candidate for the degree of M.Sc. (Med.) must have 
taken the degree of M.D. with a minimum standing of 75% in his 
special subjects and an average of 70% in the last three years of 
his Medical course. A candidate who does not meet this require- 


— 40 — 


ment may be accepted only by special permission of the Medical 
Faculty. 

A candidate in full time employment in the University or elsewhere 
will not normally be admitted to the M.Sc. (Med.) course. 

Application: Application for admission to the M.Sc. (Med.) course must 
be made to the Registrar of the University in writing at least three 
weeks before the opening of the session. Candidates, if not gradu- 
ates of Queen’s University, must send official certificates giving full 
details of their academic training. An outline of proposed studies, 
.based upon the requirements described below, must accompany the 
application. 

Curriculum: The course consists of two parts as follows: 

(1) Research and thesis, representing not less than half the ses- 
sion’s work. Except by special permission the thesis must be sub- 
mitted by May 1st for a degree in the Spring and by September 20th 
for a degree in the Fall. 

(2) Lectures or reading, laboratory or clinical work cognate to 
that of the field of study. Ordinarily half of this cognate work will 
be done in the department in which the candidate is carrying out 
his research, and the other half in one or more other departments 
not necessarily in the Medical Faculty. 

Examinations: The candidate will be required to take the following ex- 
aminations : 

(1) Two written examinations — one in each half of the cognate 
work referred to in part 2 under Curriculum. The candidate must 
obtain at least seventy-five -per cent in examinations taken in the 
Faculty of Medicine and at least second class honours in examina- 
tions taken in the Faculties of Arts or Applied Science. 

(2) An oral examination in the field of the candidate’s research by 
a committee of at least four appointed by the University Committee 
on Graduate Studies. Not more than two members of the committee 
may be chosen from the department concerned. 

Previous to the oral examination the thesis submitted by the can- 
didate must have been read and approved by this committee. 

Residence: A candidate for the degree of M.Sc. (Med.) must do all of his 
work (towards this degree) in residence at the University, during 
at least one session. 

Fees: The annual fees are as follows: Sessional fee, $120.00; Student 
Interests, including membership in the Aesculapian Society, $23.00; 
a laboratory deposit of $10.00. The degree fee is $20.00 to be paid 
by April 1st. 


— 41 — 


Teaching Assistance: Candidates for the degree of M.Sc.(Med.) may 
give not more than 10 hours per week during the academic year to 
assisting members of the Faculty in teaching or in other academic 
or clinical duties, providing that the time so lost is made up by 
work on their problem of research during the summer vacation or 
providing they extend their course over two academic years. 


DIPLOMA OF PUBLIC HEALTH (D.P.H.) 

For candidates proceeding to take this Diploma after graduation 
as M.D. 

Candidates will be entitled to enter for examination for this 
Diploma on presenting certificates of having taken: 

(1) Three months* course in Sanitary Physics (principles of statics, 
pneumatics, hydraulics, light, photometry, heat, thermometry, hygro- 
metry) . 

(2) Three months’ course in Sanitary Chemistry, especially de- 
voted to quantitative and qualitative analysis of air, water, and common 
foodstuffs; this course must include one week*s work in practical test- 
ing of milk and milk products for adulteration or sophistication. 

(3) Three months’ course in a Bacteriological Laboratory devoted 
to bacteriological aspects of Public Health work, such as examination 
of sputum, blood, swabs, water and milk, and the detection of common 
animal parasites. 

(4) Three months’ course in advanced Hygiene, covering especially 
a discussion of sewage and garbage disposal, water supplies, disinfec- 
tion, transmissible diseases, vital statistics and sanitary legislation. 

(5) Three months’ course in Sanitary Engineering, including water 
services, sewerage systems, sewage and garbage disposal. 

(6) Three months’ attendance and clinical instruction in a Hospital 
for Infectious Diseases. 

(7) Six months with a recognized Medical Officer of Health in the 
study of Practical Sanitation. 


DIPLOMA IN MEDICAL RADIOLOGY (D.M.R.) 

The Faculty of Medicine, Queen’s University, has introduced a 
grraduate course leading to a Diploma in Medical Radiology. 


— 42 — 


Candidates for the Diploma must 

(1) be graduates of a Medical School recognized by the Senate, 

(2) have spent at least one year after graduation as an interne 
in a recognized hospital or have had two years' experience 
in general practice. 

The curriculum leading to the Diploma extends over 

(A) one academic session at the University, 

(B) two terms of eleven months each of service and training in 
a recognized Radiological Department. 

Not more than two candidates will be accepted in any one academic 
session at the University. The selection of candidates rests with a 
Board appointed by the Medical Faculty. 

The following courses will be provided: — 

Part I 

1. Anatomy (radiographic) 

2. Pathology 

3. Radio-biology. 

4. Radio-physics. 

5. Radiographic Technique. 

These si^bjects will be given during the academic session. 

Part II 

6. Diagnostic Radiology 

7. Radio-therapy. 

8. General Medicine and Surgery. 

Study of these subjects is spread over the three terms. 

Examinations : 

Part I. An examination will be held at the end of each academic 
session. 

Part II. After passing the examination in Part I and having ful- 
filled the conditions of curriculum laid down in (B) above. 
Candidates who have passed the examinations will be granted the 
Diploma :n Medical Radiology (D.M.R.). 

Fees. ‘The fee for the Diploma is $150.00. In addition, candidates 
undertaking Parts I and II at the University, are charged a fee of 
$100.00 payable to the Kingston General Hospital to cover expenses 
involved. 

Further information as to details of the courses may be obtained 
on application to the Secretary of Faculty. 


— 48 — 


SCHOLARSHIPS AND HONOURS 


The following scholarships and honours are awarded to students in 
the Faculty of Medicine. The scholarships, except those awarded in the 
final year, are tenable only by students in residence in the session fol- 
lowing the award. Students may not hold scholarships unless they have 
successfully completed the work of the year in which they are enrolled. 

The Robert Bruce Scholarship 

The Robert Bruce Scholarship of about $70 awarded at the end of 
the first year to the student of Scottish extraction making the highest 
number of marks in the examinations of that year. One-third of the 
value of the Scholarship will be paid to the winner in each of the second, 
third, and fourth years of his course, provided he is in attendance in 
the Faculty in which the award was made. 

This Scholarship has been established under provisions in the will 
of the late Robert Bruce of Quebec, and similar scholarships are awarded 
in the Faculties of Arts and Science. 

The Alexander MacLachlan Peace Prize, $30 

The Alexander MacLachlan Peace Prize has been established by 
the MacLachlan family in memory of Alexander MacLachlan, former 
President of International College, Smyrna, who throughout his life 
worked for a better understanding among nations. 

Value $30. Awarded annually for the best essay of 3,000 words on 
the subject Promotion of Enduring World Peace. The prize is open to 
all undergraduates of Queen’s University, both intramural and extra- 
mural. The essay must be clearly written or typewritten, and must be 
sent in to the Registrar’s Office on or before March 1st, accompanied by 
a statement signed by the candidate that the essay is the result of his 
own reading, thinking, and discussion and that he has not been assisted 
by other students in writing it. 

Social Engineering Prize 

Value $50. Founded by A. E. MacRae of Ottawa. Awarded annually 
under the following conditions as stated by the donor. 

“The object of this prize is to promote on the part of the individual 
the practice of factually appraising his every act from the point of 
view of others concerned so that he may make it easiest for them to co- 
operate in achieving a desired objective. It is based on the idea that 
maximuhi social progress primarily demands of education the pro* 
duction in individuals of capacity to lead others in the doing of things 
which, in the long view, are for the continuing good of all. A keen 


— 44 — 


sense of responsibility for the common good, as opposed to the mere 
temporary benefit of a particular agency, is essential in efficient social 
leadership. 

“It is to be presented annually to the student in attendance at 
Queen’s University who, prior to the beginning of his or her graduat- 
ing year, has developed and exhibited greatest capacity in leading the 
student body, or any portion of it, in accomplishing purposes which are 
considered good by the majority of the student body. 

“The recipient shall be selected by a committee consisting of the 
president's of the faculty societies and the Levana Society and the 
Principal of the University or his nominee.” 

Khaki University and Y.M.C.A. Memorial Fund 

This fund is part of a sum, left from the Khaki University after 
the war of 1914-18, which was divided among the Canadian Universities. 

The interest, amounting to $240, will be used to award one or more 
scholarships open to undergraduate students in any Faculty. In award- 
ing these scholarships the need as well as the standing of applicants 
will be considered and preference will be given to sons or daughters of 
soldiers of the Great War. Applications will be received by the Regis- 
trar up to April 1 of each year. 

B’nai B’rith Kingston, Bursary 

Value $50. Founded by the B’nai B’rith Lodge of Kingston. This 
Bursary will be awarded annually to a student of promising ability 
but straitened circumstances. The award will be made on the basis of 
the final examinations. Applications will be received by the Registrar 
up to April 1 of each year. 

The 0. M. Montgomery Memorial Fund 

Established by the Aluminum Company of Canada in memory of 
Mr. 0. M. Montgomery, who graduated from Queen’s University in 
Electrical Engineering in 1905. This Fund will be used to provide 
bursaries for worthy students in need of financial help. It will be ad- 
ministered by a Committee consisting of the Principal, the Vice-Prin- 
cipal, the Registrar, and a representative of the Aluminum Company. 
Awards may be made in any Faculty, and may only be regarded as 
gifts at the discretion of the Committee when made to sons or daughters 
of employees of the Aluminum Company. Otherwise repayment is 
expected in one or both of the following ways: 

(1) By service to the University if the beneficiary has time and is 
qualified for the work available. Such service shall be assist- 
ance in a department, or office, or library, or laboratory, or 
some other comparable employment. 


(2) By return in cash of the sum granted, or of the part not worked 
out. In such case the award is regarded as a loan without 
interest, payable at some convenient time to be agreed upon. 

The Reuben Wells Leonard Scholarships 

Under the will of the late Reuben Wells Leonard provision wag 
made for the following Scholarships: 

Reuben Wells Leonard Special Scholarships 

Special Reuben Wells Leonard Scholarships for merit and need 
will be awarded in varying amounts to students of promising ability but 
straitened circumstances. The awards will be made on a loan or service 
basis. 

Reuben Wells Leonard Fellowships 

Fellowships of varying amounts will be available during the session 
1945-46 for Queen’s graduates continuing their work at Queen’s Uni- 
versity. Application for these Fellowships will be received by the 
Registrar up to April 1st. 

The W. W. Near and Susan Near Scholarships and Bursaries 

Under the wills of the late W. W. Near and his widow, the late 
Susan Near, provision was made for the following scholarships and 
bursaries. 

1. An annual scholarship of the value of $-80 will be awarded to the 
student with the highest standing in each of the first, second, third and 
fourth years. 

2. An annual scholarship of the value of $40 will be awarded to 
the student taking second place in each of the first, second, third and 
fourth years. 

3. An annual scholarship of the value of $50 will be awarded to 
the student taking second place in the fifth year. 

These scholarships will be tenable only by students who are in 
attendance the year following the award. 

4. An annual scholarship of the value of $100 will be awarded to 
the sixth year student with the highest standing throughout his course. 

5. An annual scholarship of the value of $70 will be awarded to 
the sixth year student with the second highest standing throughout his 
course. 

6. Three bursaries of the value of $100 each will be awarded an- 
nually to students who in any year have shown an interest in and 
aptitude for practical work in a laboratory, and will undertake to carry 


— 46 — 


out work of a research nature in the laboratory during the year fol- 
lowing the award. 

Applications for these bursaries must be made to the Secretary of 
the Medical Faculty not later than April 1st of each year. 

Roberta McCulloch Scholarship in Engush 

Founded by the late Andrew McCulloch, M.A., of Thorold. 

Value $40. Awarded annually to the student standing first in 
Medical English. 

Pipe Band Scholarship 

Value $25. Maintained by the Queen’s University Pipe Band. 
Awarded annually to the best piper among first year students in all 
faculties on the basis of a piping contest. 

The N. F. Dupuis Scholarship 

The N. F. Dupuis Scholarship of $50 awarded to the student making 
the highest number of marks in the examinations in Chemistry of the 
second year. The Scholarship was founded by the graduates as a mark 
of their appreciation of the long and effective services of the late Dr. 
N. F. Dupuis, Professor of Mathematics. 

Sylvanus Joy Scholarship 

A Scholarship of $40 awarded for proficiency in Materia Medica. 

The D. T. Smith Prize in Pharmacology 

A prize, value $20, awarded to the student in the fourth year 
making the highest number of marks in Pharmacology. 

The Victor Lyall Goodwill Memorial Scholarship in Internal 

Medicine 

Value $100. This Scholarship was founded in 1937 by Mrs. Florence 
M. Goodwill of Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, in memory of her 
late husband Dr. Victor Lyall Goodwill. It will be awarded annually 
to a student at the end of his Fifth year in consideration of: — (1) his 
standing in written and clinical oral examinations of the session, (2) 
his capacity to examine patients as brought out by the written clinical 
histories of cases assigned to him during the session. 

Reuben Wells Leonard Penultimate Year Scholarships 

Under the will of the late Reuben Wells Leonard provision was 
made for one Scholarship of the value of $300 and one of the value of 
$200, to be awarded to the students obtaining highest and second high- 
est standing respectively at the end of the penultimate year. The stu- 
dent must be in attendance in his final year. 

-__47_ 


The David Edward Mundell Prize 

The David Edward Mundell Prize of $40, awarded to the student 
making the highest aggregate marks in the Surgical Applied Anatomy 
final examinations of the fifth and sixth years. 

The Dean Fowler Scholarship 

The Dean Fowler Scholarship of $40 awarded to the student making 
the highest number of marks in the examinations of the sixth year. 

Sir John C. Schultz Memorial Scholarship 
Value $80. Founded by his widow in memory of the late Sir John 
€. Schultz, K.C.M.G., M.D., LL.D., F.R.S., a leader of the loyal settlers 
against Riel in the Rebellion of 1869-70, and later a Lieutenant Gover- 
nor cf Manitoba. The Scholarship is based on the combined results of 
the sessional examinations of the fourth and fifth years, and is awarded 
when the student is in actual attendance in his final year. It is open 
only to male students of British descent, and the holder must be of good 
Christian character, a total abstainer, and of satisfactory scholastic 
attainments. Preference will be given to non-smokers and to students 
who are planning to become medical missionaries. Applications will be 
received by the Secretary up to November 30th of each year. 

The Victor Lyall Goodwill Memorial Prize 
Value $100. This prize was founded in 1936 by Mrs. Florence M. 
Goodwill of Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, in memory of her 
late husband Dr. Victor Lyall Goodwill. The award is made annually 
to the student who submits the best essay dealing with some aspect of 
Mental Health or Disease. 

Essays submitted for this prize should be handed in not later than 
March 15th. 

Ontario Medical Association Prize in Preventive Medicine 
An annual prize of twenty-five dollars has been instituted in the 
class of Preventive Medicine by the Ontario Medical Association. The 
first award of the prize was made at the close of session 1931-32 to the 
student who gained the highest marks in the class examinations. 

Professor’s Prize in Preventive Medicine 
A prize awarded to the student who is proxime accessit in the class. 

The Edgar Forrester Scholarship 
Founded under the will of the late Edgar Forrester, B.A., M.D. 
Value $40. Awarded to the student making the highest number 
of marks in final year Medicine and Clinical Medicine, 
making the highest aggregate marks in Surgical Applied Anatomy. 


— 48 — 


The Hannah Washburn Polson Prize 

A prize of $50.00, endowed by Dr. James A. Poison of New York, 
for proficiency in Clinical Diagnosis in Medicine, Surgery and Obstetrics. 
The award will be made to a student in the final year. 

The Neil Currie Polson Memorial Prize 

The Neil Currie Poison Memorial Prize of $50, awarded to the stu- 
dent in final year Medicine judged by his teachers to be the best 
adapted to apply his training in practice. 

Professor's Prize in Surgery 

A prize awarded to the student in the final year making the highest 
standing in Surgical Subjects. 

Professor's Prize in Obstetrics and Gynaecology 

A prize awarded to the student in the final year making the highest 
standing in these subjects. 

The Mylks Medal in Obstetrics and Gynaecology 

Awarded to the student in final year Medicine who has had the best 
record in Obstetrics and Gynaecology during his course. 

The Isobel McConville Scholarship 

Under the will of the late Dr. Isobel McConville provision was made 
for the following scholarships: 

1. Value $100. Awarded annually to the student in fifth year making 
the highest number of marks in Gynaecology. 

2. Two scholarships — one of $50, the other of $25 — available to students 
of the fourth year for the best and second best essays on any ap- 
proved surgical subject. 

George and Mary Louise Patton Scholarship 

Value $80. Awarded annually to the student in the fourth year 
who in the opinion of the professors concerned shows the greatest apti- 
tude in the clinical work of the year. 

Toronto Branch of the General Alumni Scholarship 

Value $100. Given by the Toronto Branch of the General Alumni 
Association for a period of five years. Awarded to the student of the 
third year with the highest standing in Physiology and Bacteriology. 

University Medals 

A University Medal awarded to the student making the highest 
number of marks in the examinations of the sixth year in Clinical 
Medicine, Pathology, Preventive Medicine, and Clinical Psychiatry. 


— 49 — 


A University Medal awarded to the student making the highest 
number of marks in the examinations of the sixth year in Clinical 
Surgery, Surgery, and Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat. 

The following awards are not endowed and are made only if the 
money is available: — 

The Bernard Thomas McGhie Memorial Scholarship 

The Bernard Thomas McGhie Memorial Scholarship of $100 awarded 
to a student in the fifth year on the basis of his academic standing, 
interest and aptitude in the study of Psychiatry and Psychosomatic 
Medicine. This Scholarship was established by the Government of 
Ontario in memory of Dr. B. T. McGhie, Deputy Minister of Health 
and Hospitals, who during his lifetime made such an outstanding con- 
tribution in the fields of Psychiatry, Public Health and Hospital Admin- 
istration. 

The Helen E. Dwyer Memorial Scholarship 

A scholarship of $50 presented by Dr. James G. Dwyer of New 
York, awarded to the student making the highest number of marks in 
the courses in Embryology and Histology of the second year. 

The Boak Prize 

The Boak Prize in Anatomy, value $25, donated by Dr. Eric 
W. Boak, of Victoria, B.C., awarded to the student making the highest 
number of marks in the written and oral examinations in Anatomy of 
the third year. 

The John Franklin Kidd Essay Prizes 

The John Franklin Kidd Essay Prizes, the gift of Mrs. Kidd of 
Ottawa, one of $100 and one of $50, available to members of the fourth, 
fifth and sixth years for the best essays on a surgical topic. 

Essays for these prizes should be submitted not later than March 15. 

Canadian National Committee for Mental Hygiene Prize 

A prize of $50 awarded by the Canadian National Committee for 
Mental Hygiene to the student making the highest marks in Psychiatry. 

Richardson Fellow in Pathology-General Hospital 

On the foundation of this Fellowship in 1927, Alice F. Richardson 
undertook to maintain the annual salary of a clinical Pathologist to 
the Hospital for a period of five years. Mrs. Richardson died in 1931, 
but has made provision for the maintenance of the Fellowship. Appoint- 
ment is open to graduates, preference being given to those who have 
previously served as Internes or taken special training in Pathology. 


— 50 — 


Salary, $50 per month, with rooms and board in Hospital. Ap- 
pointments may be held for one or more years at the discretion of the 
Committee. The appointee will have the status of a senior interne in 
Hospital, and outlining of duties will be under control of a Committee 
consisting of the Professors of Medicine, Surgery and Pathology. 

Exhibition op 1851 — Science Research Scholarship 

This scholarship of the annual value of £250 stg., is awarded by 
Her Majesty’s Commissioners for the Exhibition of 1851 to students 
who have given evidence of capacity for original research, and are 
under 26 years of age. A given number of scholarships are awarded 
annually to students in Canada, recommended by tne universities ap- 
proved by the Commissioners. 

The nominee must be a British subject, must have been a hona fide 
student of science for three years, must have been a student of the Uni- 
versity for a full year immediately before his nomination, must be a 
student of the University at the time of his nomination, and must 
pledge himself not to hold any position of emolument whilst holding 
the scholarship without special permission from the Commissioners. 
He is recommended to the Commissioners by the Senate of the Univer- 
sity. The scholarship will be tenable ordinarily for two years, and in 
cases of exceptional merit, for three years. The scholai will in the 
absence of special circumstances be required to proceed to a country 
other than that in which he received his scientific training and there 
pursue some investigation likely to promote technical industries or 
scientific culture. The particular investigation the student proposes to 
pursue must be stated before a scholarship can be awarded. 

The George Christian Hoffman Fellowships 

The Alpha Fellowship for Pathological Research of $800 and the 
Beta Fellowship for extended studies in Surgery oif $600 awarded to 
recent graduates nominated by the Faculty and approved by the Senate 
of the University. The awards will be determined by the undergradu- 
ate record of the candidates and upon evidence of capacity for original 
research. Applications for these Fellowships should be made to the 
Secretary of the Faculty not later than the first of March in each year. 

The applicant must give detailed information regarding his ex- 
perience since graduation and indicate definitely the work which he 
plans to do while holding the Fellowship and tbe institutions in which 
this work will be carried out. 

The holders of the Fellowships shall proceed to some Institution or 
University in Europe or the United States of America, approved by the 
Senate of the University, where post-graduate study and research may 
most advantageously be pursued. The Fellowships may be tenable for 
a second or even a third year, upon the recommendation of the Faculty. 


— 61 — 


The George Christian Hoffman Fellowships have been awarded as 
follows : 

In Pathology:— 1937, John Clinton White, M.D., C.M. (1930). 

1938, Leslie Sparling Jolliffe, M.D., C.M. (1936). 

1939, Edward Douglas Rooke, M.D., C.M. (1937). 

1940, James Stuart Young, B.A., M.D., C.M. (1938). 

In Surgery: — 1937, Robert Randolph Mutrie, M.D., C.M. (1934). 

1938, Edwin Perry White, M.D., C.M. (1934). 

1939, Thomas Neil Tweddell, M.D., C.M. (1936). 

1940, Osier Briggs Dickinson, M.D., C.M. (1935). 

1947, William James Spencer Melvin, B.A., 

M.D.,C.M. (1943). 

Since 1940 no awards have been made in Pathology. 

The list of awards in earlier years will be found in the 1941-42 
Calendar. 

William Spankie Memorial Medical Research Endowment Fum# 

The late Dr. William Spankie provided in his Will for a fund 
“to promote Medical Research at Queen^s University under rules and 
regulations to be determined by the Board of Trustees and approved 
by the Executors and Trustees of the Estate.” 

The present income is $400 a year. 

The research must be carried on at Queen’s University or in one 
of the City Hospitals associated with it. 

Reports upon research problems assisted by the fund must be sub- 
mitted to the Committee of Administration. 

All applications for grants should be addressed to the Principal- 


— 52 — 


REQUIREMENTS FOR LICENCE 


Kingston is a centre for the Examinations of the Medical Council 
of Canada. The written examinations are held in one of the University 
buildings, and the clinical examinations in the General Hospital. 

Dominion of Canada 

A University Degree does not give the right to practise the pro- 
fession of Medicine. It is also necessary to conform with the laws per- 
taining to the practice of Medicine in the province, state or country in 
which it is proposed to begin practice. The Medical Council of Canada 
issues a diploma which is accepted for registration in any province of 
the Dominion. 

In order to qualify for the examination of the Medical Council of 
Canada, the candidate must hold the licence of a Provincial Board, or 
present a certificate from the Registrar of a Provincial Medical Council 
that he holds a medical degree from an approved Medical College. The 
announcement of the Medical Council of Canada may be obtained from 
Dr. J. Fenton Argue, Registrar, 180 Metcalfe Street, Ottawa. 

Each province in Canada has a special standard of medical educa- 
tion and special requirements for licence. Detailed information as to 
qualifications for the practice of Medicine in the various provinces may 
be obtained from the Provincial Registrars, as follows: 

Alberta: Dr. W. Bramley-Moore, 207 Alexandra Block, Edmonton. 

British Columbia: Dr. A. J. MacLachlan, 203 Medical Dental 
Building, Vancouver. 

Manitoba: Dr. W. G. Campbell, 605 Medical Arts Building, Win- 
nipeg. 

Neiv Brunswick: Dr. John M. Barry, 182 Princess Street, Saint 
John, N.B. 

Nova Scotia: Dr. H. L. Scammell, Provincial Medical Board of 
Nova Scotia, 196 Atlantic Street, Halifax. 

Ontario: DR. Robert T. Noble, 566 University Ave., Toronto. 

Prince Edward Island: Dr. I. J. Yeo, 193 Prince St., Charlottetown. 

Saskatchewan '.D r. G. Gordon Ferguson, 415 Birks Building, Saska- 
toon. 

Quebec: Dr. Jean Paquin, Le College des Medecins et Chirurgiens 
de la Province de Quebec, 1896 Dorchester Street, Montreal. 

The Registrar for Newfoundland is Dr. C. Macpherson, P.O. Box 
6121, St. John’s, Newfoundland. 


— 53 — 


Great Britain and Ireland 

The General Council of .Medical Education and Re^stration has 
general supervision over the various licensing and examining Boards 
and keeps the Medical Register. The main licensing and examining 
bodies recognized in Great Britain apart from the universities are as 
follows : 

In England: — The Conjoint Board of the Royal College of Surgeons 
of England and Royal College of Physicians of London, and the Society 
of Apothecaries, London. Information can be obtained from the Secre- 
tary of the English Conjoint Board, 8-11, Queen Square, Bloomsbury, 
London, W.C. 1, and the clerk of the Society of Apothecaries, Water 
Lane, Blackfriars, E.C. 4. 

In Ireland: — The Conjoint Board of the Royal Colleges of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons of Ireland, and the Apothecaries’ Hall of Ireland. 
Information can be obtained from the Secretary of the Irish Conjoint 
Board, Royal College of Surgeons, Dublin, and the Registrar, Apothe- 
caries’ Hall of Ireland, 93, Merrion Square, Dublin. 

In Scotland: — The Conjoint Board of the Royal Faculty of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons of Edinburgh and the Royal Faculty of Physicians 
and Surgeons of Glasgow. Information can be obtained from the Sec- 
retary of the Scottish Conjoint Board, 49, Lauriston Place, Edinburgh. 

Certificates of Queen’s University Medical Faculty are accepted by 
these Boards for admission to their examinations, so that those possess- 
ing the degree of M.D. from Queen’s University are entitled to all the 
privileges in Great Britain that are accorded to students and graduates 
■of other Colleges and Universities within the Empire. 


United States 

The Journal of the American Medical Association publishes an Ab- 
stract of the Laws regulating the Practice of .Medicine in the various 
States and Territories of the United States. The price of the pamphlet 
is 50c., and it may be obtained by addressing the American Medical As- 
sociation, 535 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 

The Medical School is listed as Class A by the Council on Medical 
Education and Hospitals of the American Medical Association. 

— § 4 — 


COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


ANATOMY 
Professor — D. C. Matheson, M.B. 

Assistant Professor — M. W. M. Sloane, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Embryology — Benjamin Kropp, A.M., 

Ph.D. 

Felloius — W. J. S. Melvin, B.A., M.D.,C.M. 

W. A. L. McDonald, M.D.,C.M. 


A 

Descriptive and Practical Anatomy 
Second Year 

The work of the Second Year includes (a) the dissection of the 
upper extremity, the head and neck and the thorax. The bones of each 
region are studied in connection with each part dissected. Lectures and 
demonstrations are co-ordinated with the work in the dissecting room, 
(b) In addition, a course of lectures is given on the anatomy of the 
body as a whole. This includes the definition of anatomical terms, a 
survey of the body systems and such special features as the structure 
and ossification of bones, classification of joints, the action of muscles, 
etc. 


Third Year 

(a) The remainder of the body is dissected, including the lower 
extremity, the abdomen and the pelvis: skeletal structures are studied 
in connection with the soft parts. 

(b) A review of the regions dissected during the Second Year is 
required and some questions on the final examinations will be asked on 
this part of the work. 

(c) Neuro-anatomy: — A lecture and laboratory course on the 
anatomy of the nervous system, designed to fulfil the needs of the under- 
graduate student. The various nuclei and tracts with their connections 
are considered, with emphasis on their functional importance. 


— 55 — 


Students must dissect the whole of the human body during the course. 
Preliminary and final oral or practical examinations are required from 
each student on each part dissected. Besides these, term written exam- 
inations are held in December, and final written examinations at the 
close of the spring term. Students must complete the dissection and 
take all oral examinations before being allowed to proceeed with the 
final written examinations. 

Bones of the head, trunk and upper extremity are loaned to second 
year students and bones of the lower extremity to third year students. 

Encouragement is given to students of the 4th, 5th and 6th years 
who wish to do review work in the dissecting room. 

Approved Text-Books and Books of Reference 

Cunningham, Gray, Morris, Buchanan’s Manual of Anatomy. Frazer 
and Robbins: Manual of Practical Anatomy. Cunningham: Manual of 
Practical Anatomy. Le Gros Clark: Practical Anatomy. Jamieson: 
Companion to Anatomy. Johnston: Synopsis of Regional Anatomy . Grant: 
A Method of Anatomy. Mainland : Anatomy as a basis for medical and 
dental practice. Frazer: The Anatomy of the Human Skeleton. Sobotta- 
McMurrich: Atlas of Human Anatomy.. Spaltholz: Hand Atlas of Hu- 
man Anatomy. Toldt: An Atlas of Human Anatomy. Jamieson: Il- 
lustrations of Regional Anatomy. Grant: An Atlas of Anatomy. Frazer: 
Manual of Embryology. Callander: Surgical Anatomy. Ranson: Ana- 
tomy of the Nervous System. Strong & Elwyn: Human Neuro-anatomy. 
Livingston: The Clinical Aspects of Visceral Neurology. 

B 

Embryology. The course consists of a study of fertilization, cleav- 
age, and organogeny, especially of the mammal, with illustrative ma- 
terial drawn from the chick and pig. Source articles in journals, and 
monographs, are used for collateral reading. Two lecture periods and 
three hours laboratory work each week throughout the second term of 
the second year. 

Text: Hamilton, Boyd and Mossman: Human Embryology. 

References: Keibel and Mall: Embryology. Patten: Embryology 
of the Chick. Patten: Embryology of the Pig. Carnegie Institution of 
Washington: Contributions to Embryology. Arey: Developmental 
Anatomy. Jordan and Kindred: Textbook of Embryology. Patten: 
Human Embryology. 

C 

Medical and Surgical Anatomy 
Associate Professor — S. W. Houston, M.D., C.M., F.R.C.S. 

(Edin.), F.R.C.S. (C). 

The students are taught to make practical use of the facts of ana- 
tomy, and the application of these to medical and surgical practice is 


— 56 — 


shown. Attention is directed to the manner in which the anatomy 
affects the course and progress of disease, and to the alteration in the 
anatomical relations in disease. Special attention is given to displace- 
ments in fractures and dislocations, topographical anatomy, and liga- 
ture of arteries. 


Approved Text-Books 

jPra.cfitres:Magnusson-Watson Jones. Manual of Surgical Anatomy: 
Jones and Shepard. Atlas of Surgical Approaches: Nicola. Extensile 
Approaches: Henry. 


BACTERIOLOGY 

Professor — G. B. Reed, O.B.E., M.A., B.Sc., PhD., F.R.S.C. 

Professor — ^John H. Orr, M.D., C.M., F.R.C.P.(C). 

Third Year 

1. General and Pathogenic Bacteriology. This course covers the 
general principles of bacteriology. The lectures deal with the structure 
and physiology of bacteria, the theories of infection and immunity 
and a systematic study of the pathogenic bacteria. Laboratory practice 
includes the preparation of culture media and the biochemical, cultural 
and microscopic study of bacteria. The principal pathogenic bacteria 
are isolated from hospital material. Infection and immunity are 
studied experimentally in animals and serological reactions carried out 
on human material. This will be supplemented by a detailed bacterio- 
logical study of selected cases, with laboratory work, prescribed reading 
and reports. 

Text-books: Jordan and Burrows. Zinsser and Bayne- Jones, Text- 
Book of Bacteriology ; Topley and Wilson, Principles of Bacteriology. 

Elective Courses 

1. Immunology and Physiology of the Bacteria. Lectures, reading 
and laboratory practice. 

2. Research. Properly qualified students who wish to make a 
special study of Bacteriology are admitted to the laboratory to under- 
take special problems. This work may be carried out during the ses- 
sion or in the summer, or both. 

3. Studies leading to the degree M. Sc. (Med.). The department 
offers facilities and supervision for graduates who desire to take this 
degrree in Bacteriology. 


— 57 — 


BIOLOGY 

Assistant Professor — H. Wesley Curran, M.A., Ph.D. 

Demonstrators — Robert I. Bowman. 

Walter Henson. 

First Year 

1. General Biology. — A course of three lectures and six hours of 
laboratory work per week throughout the session — botany in the first 
term and zoology in the second. 

A general survey of the plant and animal kingdoms with laboratory 
work on representatives of the main groups. During the fall, field 
trips to local points of biological interest. A study of parasitology 
with special attention to those forms which occur in Canada. Compari- 
son of various types of animals with emphasis upon mammalian ana- 
tomy. Principles of embryology, physiology, evolution and genetics. 

Text-books: Holman and Robbins, Textbook of General Botany (John 
Wiley and Sons, fourth edition). Storer, General Zoology (McGraw- 
Hill). 


BIOCHEMISTRY 

Professor — R. Gordon Sinclair, B.A., Ph.D., F.R.S.C. 

Associate Professor — J. F. Logan, M.A., Ph.D. 

Second Year 

This course is designed to bring out the general chemical principles 
underlying such processes as respiration, acid-base balance, water ex- 
change, absorption and excretion and as well to cover in a fairly com- 
prehensive manner the composition and function of the constituents of 
living things and of the foods which they require. Particular attention 
is paid to the biochemistry of the human organism. The relationship 
to clinical medicine is brought out by the discussion of the chemical 
basis of certain diseases. 

Text-books: Hawk and Bergeim, Practical Physiological Chemistry; 
Harrow, Textbook of Biochemistry ; Kleiner, Human Biochemistry. 

Mitchell, A Textbook in Biochemistry. 

Reference Books : Cameron and Gilmour, The Biochemistry of 
Medicine; Bodansky and Bodansky, Biochemistry of Disease. 


— 58 — 


CHEMISTRY 


Professor — J. A. McRae, M.A., Ph.D., F.R.I.C., F.R.S.C. 

Associate Professor of Biochemistry — J. F. Logan, M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry — W. M. Smith, B.Sc., Ph.D. 

The lecture and laboratory classes in General and Organic Chemistry 
are conducted in Gordon Hall. 

Examinations are held at intervals during the session and the stand- 
ing of the student is determined by the results of these examinations 
and by the character of his laboratory work, as well as by the grade 
obtained at the annual examination. 

No student is admitted to the annual examination who has failed 
to attain a satisfactory standard in the laboratory exercises. 

A laboratory deposit is required to cover the cost of breakages of 
apparatus and damage to laboratory property and must be paid to the 
Treasurer of the University before a locker will be assigned. 

First Year 

1. General Chemistry and Analysis. 

{a) A course of two lectures per week on the fundamental laws 
and theories of these two subjects. This course includes a description 
of the common elements and compounds and a discussion of elementary 
qualitative analysis. The lectures are illustrated by demonstrations 
and laboratory exercises. 

(6) A course of five hours per week of laboratory exercises. These 
exercises provide training in laboratory technique and include ele- 
mentary qualitative and volumetric analysis. 

Text-books: — Amsden: Physical Chemistry for Premedical Students. 
Hartsuch: Elementary Qualitative Analysis. Dorrance: Experiments 
and Problems in General Chemistry. 

Professor Smith. 

2. Organic Chemistry. 

Two lectures, and one laboratory period of three hours per 
week are given so that the student will be well grounded in the funda- 
mentals of Organic Chemistry, essential to the proper understanding of 
Biochemistry and its related sciences. Typical aliphatic and aromatic 
compounds are prepared, and their properties and reactions discussed. 

Text-books: — Wertheim: Textbook of Organic Chemistry. Wer- 
theim: Organic Chemistry, Laboratory Guide. 

Professor Logan. 

Students entering the Faculty of Medicine from the Faculty of 
Arts may receive credit for first year medical chemistry only if they 


— 59 — 


have passed with satisfactory standing Chemistry 1, 2, and 12 (Arts 
calendar of 1942-43 and preceding years) or Chemistry 1, 2, 10 and 12 
(current Arts calendar). 

ENGLISH 

Professor — J. A. Roy, M.A. (Edin.). 

The Department of English provides a course (English M) which 
must be taken by all first year Medical students. During the session 
one hour a week is devoted to the practice and technique of public 
speaking. Every student must take part during the term. He is allowed 
to select his own subject, and at the close of the hour the lecturer offers 
friendly and constructive criticism of his effort. 

Prescribed texts: Foerster and Steadman, V/riting and Thinking; 
The College Omnibus, 6th Edition, 1947, ed. J. P. McCallum; The Con- 
cise Oxford Dictionary. 

Students must also read during the session a number of works by 
standard authors, e.g.. The Doctor's Dilemma, Ghosts, The Anatomist, 
Journal of the Plague Year, etc. This list will be announced at the 
beginning of the term. 

EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 
Professor— Y. A. Cays, M.D.,C.M., F.R.C.S.(C). 

Clinical Assistants — G. B. MacPherson, M.D.,C.M. 

J. G. McBroom, M.D.,C.M. 

F. X. O’Connor, M.D.,C.M. 

The course of instruction is carried on in the Kingston General 
Hospital. There is both an In-door and Out-door service. A large Clinic 
room, in which there are three cubicles, is used for clinics and for teach- 
ing the examination of patients. 

This course is carried on during both fifth and sixth years. 

Most of the work is clinical and in addition to this, a series of lec- 
tures is delivered upon the various diseases of the Eye, Ear, Nose and 
Throat. 

Text-books: — May, Parsons, Gifford, Logan Turner, Morrison. 

Reference Books: — Duke Elder, Brown, Fuchs, Ball, de Schweinitz, 
Jackson and Jackson, Berens, Kopetzky, Jackson, Imperatori, Portman. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE 
Lecturer — P. M. Macdonnell, M.A., M.D.,C.M. 

Lecturer — T. J. Rigney, B.A., K.C. 


— 60 — 


Fifth Year 


The course in Jurisprudence includes the following: legal criminal 
procedure; Coroner’s court; medical evidence, identity; modes of dying; 
sudden death, signs of death; homicide, suicide; wounds, burns and 
scalds; suffocation, hanging and strangling; drowning, death from 
starvation, cold and heat, lightning and electricity; marriage and 
divorce; offences against chastity; pregnancy and delivery; criminal 
abortion; infanticide, causes of death to the foetus; legitimacy, im- 
potence, sterility; malingering and feigned diseases; survivorship, life 
assurance, wills, malpractice; Workmen’s Compensation Act. 

A short course deals with Toxicology or the science of poisons 
embracing the detection and treatment of criminal and accidental cases. 

Books of Eeference 

Taylor; Hamilton; Peterson, Haines and Webster; Buchanan; 
Sidney Smith ; Glaister. 

MEDICINE AND CLINICAL MEDICINE 

Professor Emeritus — W. T. Connell, M.D.,C.M., F.R.C.P. (C). 

Professor — W. Ford Connell, M.D.,C.M., M.R.C.P. (Lond.) , F.R.C.P. (C), 
F.A.C.P. 

Associate Professor of Medicine — G. Malcolm Brown, M.D.,C.M., D.Phil. 

(Oxon.), M.R.C.P. (Lond.), F.R.C.P. (C). 

Assistant Professor — B. H. Hopkins, M.B. 

Assistant Professor (in charge of Psychological Medicine) — C. H. 
McCuaig, M.D.,C.M. 

Lecturer — S. Robinson, M.D.,C.M. 

Lecturer — J. T. Tweddell, M.D.,C.M. 

Fellows — F. C. R. Chalke, M.D. 

W. A. Young, M.D.,C.M. 

Clinical Assistants — H. G. Bird, M.R.C.P. (Lond.) . 

F. D. O’Connor, M.D.,C.M. 

G. D. Scott, M.D.,C.M. 

Helen M. Holden, M.D. 

G. C. Beacock, M.D.,C.M. 

H. M. Campbell, M.D.,C.M. 

J. E. Gibson, M.D.,C.M. 

Maurice O’Connor, M.D.,C.M. 


61 — 


Fourth Year 


The instruction in this year covers the infectious diseases, diseases 
of the blood and lymph nodes, and the principles and methods of physical 
diagnosis. An introduction to the study of diseases of the heart and 
lungs is also provided. 


Fifth Year 

During the fifth year the field of general medicine is covered in a 
course of lectures and clinical demonstrations. 

Sixth Year 

Students in their sixth year are taught in small groups on the 
wards, and in a series of clinical conferences. Particular attention is 
given to differential diagnosis and therapeutics. 

Text-Books 

Clinical Methods: 

Hutchison and Hunter, Clinical Methods. Major, Pl^ysical Diag- 
nosis. 

General Medicine: 

Cecil or Osier and Christian, Principles and Practice of Medicine. 
Neurology: 

Walshe, Diseases of the Nervous System. 

Chest Diseases: 

Coope, Diseases of the Chest. 

Dermatology: 

Manual of Dermatology (Military Manual, N.R.C.) 

Therapeutics : 

Beckman, Treatment in General Practice. Dunlop, Davidson and 
McNee, Text Book of Medical Treatment. 

Books of Reference 

Cabot and Adams, Physical Diagnosis. Meakins, Textbook of Medi- 
cine. Yatev, Fundamentals of Internal Medicine. Wintrobe, Clinical 
Haematology. Brain, Diseases of the Nervous System. Wilson, Neuro- 
logy. AndT&wB, Diseases of the Skin. McKenna, Skin Diseases. Seman 
and Moritz, An Atlas of the Commoner Skin Diseases. Stokes, Syphilis. 
Moore, Modem Treatment of Syphilis. Top, Communicable Diseases. 
Norris and Landis, Diseases of tne Chest. Davidson, Practical Manual 
of Diseases of the Chest. Lewis, Diseases of the Heart. White, Heart 
Disease. Levine, Clinical Heart Disease. Scherf and Boyd, Cardiovas- 


— 62 — 


cular Diseases. Lewis, Peripheral Vascular Diseases. Allen, Barker 
and Hines, Peripheral Vascular Diseases. Scherf and Boyd, Clinical 
Electrocardiography. Graybiel and White, Clinical Electrocardiography. 
Masters, The Electrocardiogram and X-Ray Configuration of the Heart. 
Boeckus, Gastro-enterology. Joslin, Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus. 
Duncan, Diseases of Metabolism. Grollman, Essentials of Endocrinology. 
McLester, Nutrition and Diet in Health and Disease. 

OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY 

Professor — Edwin M. Robertson, M.B., Ch.B., F.R.C.O.G., F.R.C.S. 
(Edin.), F.R.C.S.(C). 

Associate Professor — Presley A. McLeod, B.A., M.D.,C.M., M.R.C.O.G., 
F.R.C.S.(C). 

Assistant Professor — Fergus J. O’Connor, M.D.,C.M. (Division of 

Obstetrics) 

Assistant Professor — Gordon W. Mylks, B.A., M.D.,C.M., F.A.C.S. 

Fifth Year 

During the session a course of lectures is given in three subjects: 
(a) normal and abnormal obstetrics; (b) gynaecology; (c) normal 
functions and diseases of the endocrine glands special to gynaecology. 

Tutorial classes and manikin drill are held weekly for sections 
of the class. 

Sixth Year 

Instruction during the sixth year is mainly clinical, clinics and 
practical instruction being given daily in the obstetrical and gynaeco- 
logical wards. 

Members of the class, in rotation, “live in” while on special practical 
obstetrical and gynaecological assignments. 

Small sections of the class, in rotation, attend an antenatal clinic. 
A course of lectures on “recent advances” and on subjects of major 
importance receiving special attention in current literature is given 
weekly. 

Weekly a revision class is held in gynaecological and obstetrical 
pathology. Each student receives a set of tissue sections which he must 
examine, sketch and annotate. 

Practical Teaching Aids 

In the practical classroom display cabinets exhibit natural-colour 
wax casts of normal organs and tumours and diseased organs common 
in gynaecological and obstetrical practice. Also, full-scale models 


allow visualization of intra-vaginal and intra-pelvic lesions : 
trans-illuminated photomicrographs and explanatory descriptions 
are set up side by side with the models. Modern instruments and drugs 
special to the practice of obstetrics and gynaecology are also on display. 
In the field of Endocrinology life-like figurines illustrate common 
endocrinopathies, monsters, dwarfs and conditions of abnormal obesity. 

The practical classroom is always open and obstetrical manikins 
and instruments are available for the study of mechanisms of labour, 
the practice of delivery, fitting pessaries, etc. 

The cinematograph is used so that mechanisms, management, man- 
ipulations and operative technique may be studied closely and discussed. 

Recommended Text-Books 

Obstetrics: De Lee-Greenhill, Scott & Van Wyck. 

Gynaecology: Curtis. 

Pathology: Novak. 

Journals: Amer. Jour. Obst. and Gyn.; Obstetrics and Gynecological 
Survey. 

Nursing: Zabriskie. 

Lay Reading: (also useful for students and practitioners) — The 
Canadian Mother and Child, (Dept, of Pensions and National 
Health) ; Getting Ready to be a Mother, (Corbin) ; Getting 
Ready to be a Father, (Corbin) ; Facts for Childless Couples, 
(Hamblen). 


PATHOLOGY 

Professor — John D. Hamilton, M.D. 

Associate Professor — W. D. Hay, M.A., M.D., C.M. 

Assistant Professor — Chester R. McLean, M.D. , C.M. 

Assistant Curators of Museum — J. T. Tweddell, M.D., C.M., 

T. N. Tweddell, M.D.,C.M. 

Fellow in Pathology — Harold W. Neuman, M.D. , CM. 

Fourth Year 

General and Systemic Pathology 

Students of the fourth year attend courses of lectures, demonstra- 
tions, and study microscopic preparations covering ten hours per week 
throughout the academic session. The first third of this course is de- 
voted to General Pathology, and the last two-thirds to Systemic Patho- 
logy. During the last half of the session, students are expected to 
attend autopsies. 


— 64 — 


Fifth Year 


Systemic Pathology 

Students of the fifth year attend a series of lectures, demonstrations 
and laboratory sessions in Pathology, occupying five hours per week 
during the session. Students are required to attend autopsies through- 
out the session, and must have seen a minimum of fifteen autopsies be- 
fore graduation. 

Books — Obligatory Texts: Boyd, or Bell, or Kaarsner. 

References: Moore, MacCallum, Forbus. 

Sixth Year 

Clinico-pathological Conferences. — Conferences on medical and sur- 
gical cases in their clinical, pathological and bacteriological aspects are 
held each Saturday morning throughout the session. These are open to 
students of the fourth, fifth and sixth years. The cases brought up 
at these conferences form the basis of the reports mentioned above. 

Students in the fourth, fifth and sixth years are required to assist 
and scribe at autopsies and to have cards filled for the same. These cards 
are to be returned to the Department of Pathology before the examina- 
tion in Pathology of the Final Year. 

PEDIATRICS 

Professor of Pediatrics — R. R. MacGregor, M.D., F.R.C.P. (C). 

Lecturer — J. S. Delahaye, M.D.,C.M. 

This course is taken in the fifth and sixth years, and is chiefly a 
clinical one. Instruction is given in the general care, management and 
feeding of infants and young children; the clinical investigation of 
diseases of infants and young children with management and treatment; 
injuries and diseases of the newly born; derangements of nutrition; and 
practical demonstrations in the preparation of infant foods. 

A limited number of students is allowed to visit twice weekly the 
well baby clinic of the Victorian Order of Nurses, where instruction 
is given in the care and feeding of well infants and in immunization 
against certain diseases. 

Text-books: Holt and McIntosh, Mitchell, Nelson. 

Books op Reference 

Marriott, Abt, Hutchison, Porter and Carter, Garrod Batten and 
Thurshfield, Kuglemas, Brown and Tisdall. 


— 65 — 


PHARMACOLOGY 


Professor— Eidon M. Boyd, M.A., M.D., C.M. 

Associate Professor — Douglas McEwen, M.A., Ph.D. 

Third Year 

The course in Pharmacology offered to students of the Third Year 
consists of two lecture and two laboratory hours per week throughout 
the session. The lecture course consists of a discussion of the history, 
pharmaceutical chemistry, metabolism, pharmacological actions and 
therapeutic uses, toxicology and method of administration of pharma- 
copoeia! and newer drugs affecting the central and peripheral nervous 
system. In the Pharmacological Laboratory, dispensing, chemical tests 
and pharmacodynamic actions of drugs will be undertaken by each 
student. A survey of laboratory results is prepared by all students 
and presented to the entire class in the form of a ten-minute seminar. 

In addition, a course of one hour a week is given upon Pharmacy, 
emphasizing the essential principles and illustrated by prescription writ- 
ing by members of the class. 

In both these courses, approximately one-half of the final mark 
per student will be based upon work done during the year. 

Fourth Year 

This course consists of three lecture hours per week throughout the 
session, during which the remaining groups of drugs will be discussed 
as in the Third Year. Students in the Fourth Year will be expected to 
know what was taken up in the Third Year. 

Books 

General Pharmacology . — 

Text: Printed Lecture Notes. 

Reference: Cushny, Billing, Douthwaite, Gilman and Goodman, 
Sollman. 

Experimental Pharmacology : — 

Text: Laboratory Manual. 

Reference: Jackson, Sollman and Hanzlik. 

Prescription Writing : — 

Text: Printed Lecture Notes. 

Reference: Eggleston, B.P., U.S.P., Bethea. 

Summer Courses 

Facilities are available to properly qualified students to investigate 


— 66 — 


assigned problems of research during the summer months. Application 
for such appointments should be made not later than January of each 
year. 


Courses for the Degree of M. Sc. (Med.) 

Candidates for the degree of M. Sc. (Med.) may select one or more 
courses in the department as part of their prescribed work. These 
courses consist of lectures, prescribed reading, seminars and expert* 
mental work. 


PHYSICS 

Professor — J. K. Robertson, M.A., F.R.S.C. 

Instructor — J. I. Lodge, B.A. 

First Year 

1. Elementary Physics. 

(а) A course of three lectures per week throughout the year. The 
course includes lectures on Statics, Dynamics, Properties of Matter, 
Heat, Sound and Light. Special emphasis is given to such subjects as 
Surface Tension, Osmotic Pressure, and some of the physical properties 
of Colloidal Solutions. Although the course is one on the fundamental 
laws of Physics, examples of the application of these laws to Medicine 
are introduced wherever it seems advisable to do so. 

(б) Two hours per week in the laboratory. 

Text-book: Stewart, Physics (Ginn & Co.). 

Second Year 

2. Electricity and Magnetism, Conduction of Electmcity through 

Gases, Roentgen Rays, Radioactivity and Nuclear Physics. 

(а) A course of two lectures per week in which a thorough ele- 
mentary treatment of the above subjects is given. In the latter half 
of the course the lectures are designed to familiarize the student with 
modern X-ray equipment and its operation, with the physical nature 
of radiations of therapeutic value and with the medical aspects of 
nuclear physics. 

(б) Lah oratory — Two hours per week. 

Text-book: Stewart, Physics (Ginn & Co.), or any good general 
physics; Robertson, Radiology Physics. 


- 67 - 


PHYSIOLOGY 


Professor — G. Spencer Melvin, M.D. 

Professor — G. Harold Ettinger, B.A., 

F.R.S.C. 

Lecturer — M. E. M. Sawyer, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Second Year 

1. Histology. A detailed study is made of the principal tissues of 
the body by an examination of fresh preparations and mounted speci- 
mens. This is followed by a study of the structure of the organs of the 
body. 

A collection of mounted slides is provided. 

Text-books: — Jordan, Text-book of Histology; Maximow and Bloom, 
Text-hook of Histology; Schafer, Essentials of Histology; Bailey, Text- 
book. 

Books of Reference — Cowdry: Special Cytology. Quain’s Anatomy: 
Vol. II, Pt. I — Microscopic Anatomy. Bolles Lee: Microtomists Vade 
Mecum. McClung: Microscopical Technique. 

Third Year 

2. Experimental Physiology, {a) A laboratory course is given in 
the dynamics of muscle and nerve, the nervous system, circulation, 
respiration, digestion, secretion, excretion, etc. (6) Students are ar- 
ranged in small groups to carry out a number of survival experiments 
in the study of the endocrines. They are responsible for the operative 
work and are required to keep records and to undertake the necessary 
investigation during the progress of the experiment. 

3. Physiology. The subject is treated systematically and the lec- 
ture course is supplemented by demonstrations and by the work in the 
experimental class. Special emphasis is laid on the application of 
application of Physiology to clinical study. 

Text-books: — Bard, McLeod* s Physiology in Modem Medicine; 
Best and Taylor, Physiological Basis for the Practice of Medicine. 

Books of Reference : Bayliss : Principles of General Physiology. New- 
ton: Recent Advances in Physiology. Schafer: Text-hook of Physiology. 
Wiggers: Physiology in Health and Disease. Wright: Applied PhysL 
ology. Cameron: Recent Advances in Endocrinology. Schafer: The 
Endocrine Glands. Robson: Recent Advances in Reproductive Physiology. 
Cannon: Mechanical Factors of Digestion. Pavlov: Work of the Digestive 
Glands. Sherrington: Integrative Action of the Nervous System. Tilney 
and Riley: The Form and Functions of the Central Nervous System. 
Liddell and Sherrington: Mammalian Physiology. Markowitz: Text- 
book of Experimental Surgery. Allen, Danforth and Doisy: Sex and 
Internal Secretions. 


— 68 —— 


Optional Courses 


4. (a) Graduate studies leading to the Degree M,Sc.{Med.), 

The department offers instruction and research supervision and 
facilities for graduates who desire to take this degree in Physiology. 

(6) Research in Physiology. 

Properly qualified students are admitted to the laboratory for post- 
graduate study and special research, even if not proceeding to a degree. 
This work may be done during the summer months, as well as during 
the teaching session. 


PSYCHIATRY 

Professor and Head of Department of Psychiatry — 

C. H. McCuaig, M.D., C.M. 

Assistant Professor — J. S. Stewart, M.D.,C.M. 

Clinical Assistant — Maurice J. O’Connor, M.D.,C.M. 

Instruction in Psychiatry is given in the third, fourth, fifth and 
sixth years. 

The third year course is chiefly concerned with Psychopathology 
and Abnormal Psychology having an especial bearing upon the psychoses 
and psychoneuroses and the emotional relationships in general medicine. 
Demonstrations as to the abnormalities of the various psychological 
functions, constitutional reaction types, personality deviations and the 
commoner mental mechanisms are stressed. 

The fourth year course consists of lectures and clinics covering the 
various forms of mental disorders. Abundant material is available both 
at the Ontario Hospital and the General Hospital. Special emphasis 
is given to the psychoneurotic disorders from the ward services in the 
General Hospital. 

Instruction in the fifth year is entirely clinical consisting of in- 
dividual investigation of case material at the D.V.A. Hospital, the 
Ontario Hospital and the General Hospital. 

In the final clinical year the students are given an opportunity 
to study and observe the various mental and emotional disorders, the 
various therapeutic measures employed in their treatment, emphasis 
being placed on the practical aspects of mental hygiene. 

Text-hooks in Psychiatry : — 

Henderson and Gillespie: Text Book of Psychiatry. 

Strecker and Ebaugh: Practical Clinical Psychiatry. 

Strecker: Outline of Psychiatry. 


— 60 — 


Weiss and English: Psychosomatic Medicine, 

Noyes: Practical Clinical Psychiatry, 

Text-hooks in Abnormal Psychology : — 

Bridges: Psychology, Normal and Abnormal, 1930. 

Fisher: Introduction to Abnormal Psychology, 1929. 

McDougall: Outline of Abnormal Psychology, 1926. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor — George Humphrey, M.A., Ph.D., F.R.S.C. 

Instructor — J. H. Houck, M.A. 

Second Year 

The course in Psychology for second year students consists of lec- 
tures and demonstrations dealing with fundamental problems of thought, 
perception, and behavior during the first term, and with clinical mani- 
festations of these problems in the second term. This course is in pre- 
paration for a later course in Psychopathology, given in the fourth year. 

Texts : 

Murphy, G., A Bmefer General Psychology, 1935. 

Text Book of Abnormal Psychology, Landis and Bolles. 

PUBLIC HEALTH AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 

The Arthur R. Elliott Professor — John Wyllie, M.A., M.D., 
B.Sc., D.P.H. 

Lecturer — A. R. J. Boyd, B.A., M.D.,C.M., D.P.H. 
field Course: 

Outdoor visits to Public Health Schemes are arranged during the 
term September to December in the Uh Year. The visits include in- 
spection of Water Supply Schemes, Sewage Disposal Plants, Ventilating 
and Heating Systems in schools, colleges and factories, an Incinerator 
Plant, a model Dairy Farm, a Pasteurizing plant. Food establishments, 
a Storage-battery plant, a Tile factory, and a Printing Press. 

The expenses incurred in the outdoor visits along v/ith the cost of 
material supplied in class to each student, are deducted from the ses- 
sional deposit. 

The work of the Public Health Nurse in the City Health Depart- 
ment, the duties of the Social Service Worker in the Children’s Aid 
Society and the functions of the Department of Social Welfare in the 
Community are described by the chief Administrators of these depart- 


— 70 — 


ments. The services of the Victorian Order of Nurses in the Com-^ 
munity are described in a lecture-demonstration by the nurse in charge 
of the local clinic. 

During the term January to April arrangements are made for small 
groups of students to attend a Child Welfare clinic, a Tuberculosis 
clinic, and a Mental Health clinic. 

Lecture Course I: 

Medical students in their Jfth Year of study attend a course of 
didactic lectures during the terms September to December, and January 
to April, dealing with the sanitary aspects of Public Health. 

The following subjects are discussed and illustrated with lantern 
slides: housing, air and ventilation, heating and lighting, water and 
water supply, domestic and community sanitation, school hygiene, in- 
dustrial hygiene, occupational diseases and medical parasitology. 

Laboratory demonstrations include chemical and bacteriological 
analyses of water and milk, methods for the detection of poisons and 
preservatives in foods, and microscopical exhibits of parasites in meat 
and the chief insect vectors of disease. 

Medical Parasitology. 

A series of weekly laboratory periods for medical students in the 
6th Year is arranged throughout the session, during which mounted and 
stained preparations are supplied to each student for microscopical ex- 
amination. The course embraces topics in medical entomology, proto- 
zoology and helminthology. 

Lecture Course II: 

Medical students in their 6th Year of study attend a course of di- 
dactic lectures on Public Health administration, vital statistics and the 
preventive and epidemiological aspects of communicable diseases, dur- 
ing the term January to April. 

A series of lectures on War Hygiene is supplemented by visits to a 
Military camp, a Naval unit and an Aerodrome. 


Books op Reference 

Currie : Manual of Hygiene. Rosenau : Preventive Medicine and Hy- 
giene. Prescott and Horwood : Sedgwick's Principles of Sanitary Science 
and Public Health. ^oydiPrev entire Medicine. Smellie: Preventive 
Medicine and Public Health. 


— 71 — 


RADIOLOGY AND PHYSICAL THERAPY 


Professor — W. A. Jones, O.B.E., M.D., F.R.C.P.(C), F.F.R. 

Associate Professor — R. C. Burr, M.D.,C.M., F.R.C.S. (Edin.) , 

Fifth Year 

One hour each week is given over to practical demonstration of X- 
ray films and lectures on radiographic diagnosis 

One hour a week is used for classes in Radiotherapy and Physical 
Therapy. These classes include lectures on, and demonstrations of X-ray 
and Radium Therapy and all the standard physical therapeutic meas- 
ures, and of manipulative surgery. 

Sixth Year 

For one hour each week lectures and demonstrations in X-ray Diag- 
nosis and Radiotherapy are given. 

Note also, course of instruction to second year students in “Elec- 
tricity and Magnetism, conduction of electricity through gases, Roentgen 
Rays and Radioactivity,’^ given by Department of Physics. 

Books of Reference 

Robertson: Radiology Physics. Shanks, Kerley and Twining: A 
Textbook of X-Ray Diagnosis. Pancoast, Pendergrass, Schaffer: Head 
and Neck in Roentgen Diagnosis. Golden: Diagnostic Roentgenology. 
Kohler: Roentgenology. Watson Jones: Fractures and Other Bone In- 
juries. Walter Mercer: Orthopedic Surgery. Comroe: Arthritis. 
MacKee: X-Rays and Radium in the Treatment of Diseases of the Skin. 
Deiario: Roentgen and Radium Therapy. Pack and Livingstone: Treat- 
ment of Cancer and Allied Diseases. Canadian Medical Association: 
Handbook on Cancer. Cutler, Buschke: Cancer, its Diagnosis and Treat- 
ment. Pohle: Clinical Roentgen Therapy. Bierman: Medical Application 
of a Short Wave Current. Wolfe: Textbook of Physiotherapy. Krusen: 
Physical Medicine. 

SURGERY 

Professor — D. L. C. Bingham, M.B., Ch.B., F.R.C.S.(Edin.), 

F.R.C.S. (C). 

Associate Professor-^. W. Houston, M.D.,C.M., F.R.C.S. (Edin.) 

F.R.C.S.(C). 

Associate Professor-D. W. Boucher, M.D.,C.M., F.R.C.S. (Edin.) 

Lecturer m Anaesthesiology — W. A. Campbell, M.D.,C.M. 


- 72 -^ 


Lecturer in Anaesthesiology — H. S. Angrove, 

Lecturer — Basil M. Koster, M.D. 

Clinical Assistant — G. C. Lindsay, 

Clinical Assistant — H. M. Warner, M.D.,C.M. 

Surgical Registrar — A. H. Megill M.D.,C.M. 

Clinical Assistant in Surgical Pathology — T. N. Tweddell, 

M.D.,C.M. 

Clinical Assistant in Anaesthesiology — A. D. Milligan, 


Third Year 

The student is first brought in contact with hospital cases in the 
third year. 

Fourth Year 

In the fourth year a course of systematic lectures on general surgery 
is given in which the principles and practice of surgery are discussed. 
Clinics are held in the General Hospital, the Hotel Dieu, and the Ontario 
Hospital. During the year emphasis is placed upon physical diagnosis 
and the general approach to the patient. 

Fifth Year 

In the fifth year the surgical specialties are introduced to the stu- 
dent and emphasis is placed upon bedside teaching. During the second 
term a practical class is held on bandaging, the application of plaster 
of Paris splints, the administration of intravenous fluids, and other minor 
surgical procedures. 


Sixth Year 

The sixth year is devoted chiefly to clinical surgery. 

Clinics are held at the Kingston General Hospital, Rockwood Hos- 
pital, Kingston Veteran’s Hospital and Hotel Dieu. In addition every 
possible opportunity is afforded the student throughout the session to 
attend operations performed by members of the staff at the different 
hospitals, a limited number of students being permitted to view the 
operations from the floor. 

Anaesthesiology 

A course of lectures is given in the fifth year, and practical demon- 
strations in the fifth and sixth years by Dr. Campbell and his staff. 


— 73 — 


Approved Text-books: 

Christopher; Illingworth; Thomson, Miles, and Wilkie; Bailey and Love; 
Homans; Romanis and Mitchiner. 

Fractures: Watson-Jones. 

Orthopaedics: Mercer; McMurray. 

Physical Diagnosis : Physical signs in Clinical Surgery^ Hamilton Bailey. 
Anaesthesiology: Minnit and Gillies, Text Book of Anaesthetics. 

UROLOGY 

Professor — N. E. Bbirry, M.D.,C.M. 

Clinical Assistant — E. P. White, M.D.,C.M., F.R.C.S.(Edin.) . 
Fifth Year 

A course of lectures is given of one hour a week covering venereal 
diseases and general urology. 

The students attend, in rotation, the general venereal clinic. 

Sixth Year 

The course consists of two hours per week and is devoted largely 
to clinical and operative urology. An attempt is made to familiarize 
the student with simple instrumental procedures by taking the students 
in small groups. 

Books op Reference 

Eisendrath and Rolnick: Urology. LeComte: Manual of Urology. 
Burke: Venereal Diseases. 


■ 74 — 


MEDALS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

Sixth Year 

Awarded February, 1946 

Medal in Medicine: 

Fred Baillie Rabkin, M.Sc., Winnipeg, Manitoba. 
Medal in Surgery: 

Lawson Bruce Cronk, Belleville, Ontario. 

The Mylks Medal in Obstetrics and Gynaecology: 

Aron David daman, B.A., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan 


The W. W. Near and Susan Near Pries of $100.00 awarded to the stu- 
dent making the highest standing throughout the medical course; 
and of $70.00 to the student making the second highest standing: 


1st: Frederick Robert Doerffer, Hamilton, Ontario. 
2nd: Lawson Bruce Cronk, Belleville, Ontario. 


The Dean Fowler Scholarship of $40.00 for the highest marks in the 
examinations of the sixth year: 


Aron David Claman, B.A., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan] 

John Clinton McIntosh Fetterley, Oshawa, Ontario J equa 
The Edgar Forrester Scholarship of $40.00 awarded to the student 
making the highest number of marks in final year Medicine and 
Clinical Medicine : 


Fred Baillie Rabkin, M.Sc., Winnipeg, Manitoba. 
The Professor’s Prize in Surgery and Clinical Surgery: 

John Clinton McIntosh Fetterly, Oshawa, Ontario. 
The Professor’s Prize in Obstetrics and Gynaecology: 
William Edwin O’Hara, Brockville, Ontario. 


The Ontario Medical Association Prize of $25.00 for the highest marks 
in Preventive Medicine: 

Robert Kennedy Smiley, B.A., Wolseley, Saskatchewan. 

The Professor’s Prize in Preventive Medicine: 

Marcel Blanchaer, B.A., Kingston, Ontario. 


The David Edward Mundell Prize of $40.00 for the highest aggregate 
marks in the Surgical Applied Anatomy Final Examinations of the 
fifth and sixth years: 

Robert Kennedy Smiley, B.A., Wolseley, Saskatchewan. 

The Neil Currie Poison Memorial Prize of $50.00 awarded to the stu- 
dent in final year Medicine judged by his teachers to be the best 
adapted to apply his training in practice: 

John Clinton McIntosh Fetterly, Oshawa, Ontario. 


— Vb— 


The Hannah Washburn Poison Prize of $50.00 for proficiency in Clinical 
Diagnosis in Medicine, Surgery and Obstetrics: 

Lawson Bruce Cronk, Belleville, Ontario. 

The John Franklin Kidd Essay Prizes for the best essays on a surgical 
topic : 

(1) John Andrew Milliken, Regina, Saskatchewan. 

(2) Frederick William Arber, Tweed, Ontario. 

The Victor Lyall Goodwill Memorial Prize of $100.00 for an essay on 
some aspect of the study of Mental Disease: 

John Andrew Milliken, Regina, Saskatchewan, and 

Robert Kennedy Smiley, B.A., Wolseley, Saskatchewan 

The Professor’s Prize for Pathological Case Reports: (equal). 

Clarence Andrew Coady, B.A., Hazelbrook, Prince Edward 
Island. 

James Publow Grant, Kingston, Ontario. 

John Andrew Milliken, Regina, Saskatchewan. 

Fifth Year 
Awarded May, 1946 

The Reuben Wells Leonard Penultimate Year Scholarships of the values 
of $300 and $200. Awarded to the students obtaining highest and 
second highest standing respectively at the end of the penultimate 
year. The student must be in attendance in the final year. 

1st: Margaret Sarah Elliott, Tweed, Ontario. 

2nd: James William Pearce, Port Dover, Ontario. 

The W. W. Near and Susan Near Scholarship of $50 to the student with 
the second highest standing in the fifth year: 

James William Pearce, Port Dover, Ontario. 

The Victor Lyall Goodwill Memorial Scholarship of $100 in Internal 
Medicine: 

Herbert William Henderson, St. Catharines, Ontario 

The Canadian National Committee for Mental Hygiene Prize of $50 
in Psychiatry: 

John Pierre Piderman, Port Coquitlam, British Columbia. 

The B. T. McGhie Memorial Scholarship of $100 in Psychiatry and 
Psychosomatic Medicine : 

Herbert William Henderson, St. Catharines, Ontario. 

Third Year 

The W. W. Near and Susan Near Scholarships of $80 to the student 
making the highest standing on the examinations of the third year. 


— 76 — 


and of $40 to the student making the second highest standing. 

1st: William Joseph Edmund Spence, Perth, Ontario. 

2nd: Honour: James Delmar Blaine, Carleton Place, Ont. 

Award: Edward Armon Atack, Kingston, Ont. 

The Boak Scholarship of $25 awarded to the student making the highest 
marks in the written and oral examinations in Anatomy of the third 
year. 

Walter Grettir Kristjanson, Geraldton, Ontario. 

The N. F. Dupuis Scholarship of $50 awarded to the student making the 
highest marks in Chemistry of the third year. 

Honour: William Joseph Edmund Spence, Perth, Ontario. 

Award: James Delmar Blaine, Carleton Place, Ont. 

Second Year 
Awarded May, 1946 

The W. W. Near and Susan Near Scholarships of $80 awarded to the 
student making the highest standing on the examinations of the 
second year, and of $40 to the student making the second highest 
standing : 

1st: Gerald Cameron Thom.as, Ottawa, Ontario. 

2nd: Honour: John Stewart Mcllraith McAuley, Ottawa, Ont. 

Award: James Ernest Devitt, Ottawa, Ontario. 

The Helen E. Dwyer Memorial Scholarship of $50 for the highest marks 
in Embryology and Histology of the second year: 

John Stewart Mcllraith McAuley, Ottawa, Ontario. 

First Year 
Awarded May, 1946 

The Robert Bruce Scholarship awarded to the student of Scottish 
extraction making the highest number of marks on the regular 
examinations of the first year; 

Caroline Phelps Coghill, Ottawa, Ontario. 

The W. W. Near and Susan Near Scholarships of $80 awarded to the 
student making the highest standing on the examinations of the 
first year, and of $40 to the student making the second highest 
standing : 

1st: Arthur Leslie Perry, Canora, Saskatchewan. 

2nd: Irving Soloway, Ottawa, Ontario. 

The Roberta McCulloch Scholarship in English awarded to the student 
standing first in Medical English; 

John Ralph Gordon, Schreiber, Ontario. 


— 77 — 


STUDENTS IN ATTENDANCE 


1946-1947 
Sixth Year 

September, 1946, to May, 1947 


Lloyd Hanbur Annis Owen Sound, Ont. 

Gordon Walter Duncan Armstrong Ottawa, Ont. 

Richard Edward Beck Vancouver, B.C. 

Alice Winnifred Bertram, B.A Dundas, Ont. 

Thomas James Bresnahan Pembroke, Ont. 

Frederic Norman Brown Ottawa, Ont. 

Martin William Chepesiuk, B.A. Kingston, Ont. 

David Cohen, B.A Westmount, Que. 

Fischel Jerome Goodin Fort William, Ont. 

Joseph Alexander Stewart Dorrance Kingston, Ont. 

Emerson Cushing Dowd Ottawa, Ont. 

Herbert Ebner, B.A Montreal. Que. 

Sarah Margaret Elliott Tweed, Ont. 

Leo Irwin Erdil, B.A. Kingston, Ont. 

Archie Richard Foley, B.A Howe Island, Ont. 

William Robert Ghent St. Catharines, Ont. 

Lazarus Gossack, B.A Montreal, Que. 

Norman Nelson Halpern Montreal, Que. 

George Eugene Hayunga Tuckahoe, N.Y. 

Herbert William Henderson St. Catharines, Ont. 

Richard Franklin Hesler Welland, Ont. 

Edwin Holmes, B.A Montreal, Que. 

Paul Kowalishin Canora, Sask. 

Sidney Kronick Ottawa, Ont. 

Frederick Howard Lapp Kingston, Ont. 

James Hayden Lindsay, B.A Montreal, Que. 

William Frederick Lingard Port Hope, Ont. 

Jack Leonard McMillan, B.A. Vancouver, B.C. 

James Henry Storey Mahood, B.A Kingston, Ont. 

Gilles Marion Ottawa, Ont. 

John Edward Merriman Ottawa, Ont. 

George Lashley Mullin Kingston, Ont. 

James Howard Nelson, B.A Brandon, Man. 

James William Pearce Brantford, Ont. 

Charles Bernard Pender Prescott, Ont. 

John Pierre Piderman Port Coquitlam, B.C. 

Lionel Resnikoff Peekskill, N.Y. 

John Charles Arthur Sibley Vancouver, B.C. 

Max Vechter Belleville, Ont. 


— 78 — 


Albert George Vey Victoria, B.C. 

James Cramer Woodman Kingston, Ont. 


Fourth Year 

September, 1946, to May, 1947 


Glen John Ankenman Gowanstown, Ont. 

Edward Armon Atack Kingston, Ont. 

Ealph Delos Atyeo Belleville, Ont. 

William Bolton Beattie Renfrew, Ont. 

Franklin Berkman Ottawa, Ont. 

Thomas Murray Black Regina, Sask. 

James Delmar Blaine Carleton Place, Ont. 

David Alexander Boyes Vancouver, B.C. 

Clifford John Carnahan Hamilton, Ont. 

George Clifford Clark Kingston, Ont. 

John Blair Cockburn Ottawa, Ont. 

Stephen Burritt Collins Ottawa, Ont. 

Peter William Davey Hamilton, Ont. 

Frederick Rayson Downer Vancouver, B.C. 

John Gordon Erickson Vancouver, B.C. 

Patrick Joseph Farrell Copper Cliff, Ont. 

Arnold Goldstein Prince Albert, Sask. 

Harold Gordon Hamilton Westport, Ont. 

Richard Charles Horatio Hitchen, B.A Vancouver, B.C. 

John Howard Houck, M.A Brampton, Ont. 

Ernest Arthur Jarman Vancouver, B.C. 

Tibor Marton Jeremias Niagara Falls, Ont. 

Walter Grettir Kristjanson Geraldton, Ont. 

Charles Gordon Louden Morrisburg, Ont. 

Donald Angus McMillan Thorold, Ont. 

Gordon James Mack Toronto, Ont. 

Glenn Marvin Martin Ottawa, Ont. 

Helen Louise Martin Winnipeg, Man. 

Stanley Fred Morrill Schreiber, Ont. 

John Joseph Neville Tamworth, Ont. 

Donald Oakley Vancouver, B.C. 

John Stewart Packham Caistor Centre, Ont. 

Herbert Garfield Parkin Norwood, Ont. 

Paul Peters Regina, Sask. 

John Redmond Phillips Oakville, Ont. 

Kenneth Graham Phin, B.A Whitby, Ont. 

Arthur Edward Ross Kingston, Ont. 

Wilfred Arthur Roy Timmins, Ont. 

Joseph Elso Anthony Schincariol Windsor, Ont. 

Norman Andrew Scott Peterborough, Ont. 


— 79 — 


Melville Howard Shaw Vancouver, B.C.. 

Donald Thomas Smylie New Liskeard, Ont. 

William Joseph Edmund Spence Perth, Ont. 

George Hamilton Stone Listowel, Ont. 

Trevor James Guy Thompson Hamilton, Ont. 

John Edward Vincent, B.Sc. Montreal, Que. 

William Charles Wedlock, B.A Peterborough, Ont. 

Ethel Ruth Whitfield, B.A Belleville, Ont. 

Third Year 

September, 1946, to May, 1947 

Theodore Augustus Anderson Renfrew, Ont. 

Lyon, Henry Appleby, B.A Vancouver, B.C. 

Nancy Eileen Armbrust Fenwick, Ont. 

William Arthur Douglas Blair Perth, Ont. 

John Douglas Bonell Ottawa, Ont. 

Ronald Ritchie Bonnell Victoria, B.C. 

Donald Earl Bowes Turtleford, Sask. 

Lewis Stafford De Summarey Carey Pender Harbour, B.C. 

Wallace Belton Carruthers Florence, Ont. 

George Edward Cragg Vancouver, B.C. 

James Eric Curtis Windsor, Ont. 

Sydney Thomas Dallimore Kingston, Ont. 

Malcolm Hewlin Clark Dean Caledonia, Ont. 

Donald James Delahaye Kingston, Ont. 

James Ernest Devitt Ottawa, Ont. 

Edward Walker Dow Kingston, Ont. 

John Francis Flood West Coxsackie, N.Y. 

Eve Forrest Port Coquitlam, B.C. 

George Frkovich Kapuskasing, Ont. 

James Eastwood Gibbons Smiths Falls, Ont. 

Percy Vaughan Gladdy Sarnia, Ont. 

John Elmer Green Burgessville, Ont. 

Campbell Gulliford St. John’s, Nfld. 

Robert Deighton Wilson Guselle Arnprior, Ont. 

Robert William Vance Hanbidge Humbolt, Sask. 

James Donald Hare Simcoe, Ont. 

John David Haynes Mactier, Ont. 

Mervyn Alexander Hopkinson Hamilton, Ont. 

William Oliver Jackson Simcoe, Ont. 

Gordon Albert Judge Burford, Ont. 

Edward Hamilton Newill Lambert, B.A .Oakville, Ont. 

Samuel Francis Legris, B.A Sudbury, Ont. 


— 60 —. 


John Stewart Mcllraith McAuley 

Neil Bruce McCannel 

Gilbert Norman Mcllveen 

Augus Hugh MacMillan 

David Morris Marcus 

Mary Julia Mate 

Robert Isaac Merritt 

John Colvin Morgan 

Walter Ivan Neilson, B.Sc 

James Edward Nelles 

John Page 

Vincent John Politi 

Edythe Evelyn Porter 

James Ronald Scott 

Sydney Segal, B.Sc 

William Ruthman Simon 

Gerald Cameron Thomas 

Durrand Everett Wallar 

Harold Foord Williamson 

Thomas Inman Woodley 


- Ottawa, Ont. 

Regina, Sask. 

Bowmanville, Ont. 

Regina, Sask. 

Belleville, Ont. 

Fort Erie, Ont. 

Smith ville, Ont. 

Fort William, Ont. 

Lennoxville, Que. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Owen Sound, Ont. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Oxenden, Ont. 

Penetanguishene, Ont. 

Montreal, Que. 

Brockville, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Winnipeg, Man. 

Bell-sville, Ont. 

Belleville, Ont. 


Second Year 


September, 1946, to May, 1947 


George Granville Allen 

William Henry Barnes 

Beverly Jane Baxter 

Donald William Baxter 

William Herbert Boquist .... 
Donald Wesley Carnduff .... 

John Kenneth Clayton 

Caroline Phelps Coghill 

James Maurice Cornell 

Harold Wallace Cumming 
Malcolm Joseph Delaney ... 

Robert Andrew Duncan 

Harold Yale Fenwick 

John Charles Gallivan 

John Ralph Gordon 

Lloyd Carman Guest 

Raymond John Halliday ... 

John Nicholas Hartt 

Albert Gordon Hewitson 

Norman Alexander Hinton 


Regina, Sask. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Colborne, Ont. 

- Kenora, Ont. 

Kenora, Ont. 

Ceylon, Sask. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Fort William, Ont. 

Kingston, Ont. 

Prescott, Ont. 

Kingston, Ont. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Schreiber, Ont. 

Billing’s Bridge, Ont, 

Kingston, Ont. 

Trenton, Ont. 

Cornwall, Ont. 

Kingston, Ont. 


-^ 1 — 


Norris Edmund Hunt Ottawa, Ont. 

Edwin Sylvester Janack Iroquois, Ont. 

Thomas Carman Johnson Murrayville, B.C. 

Duane Willis Justus Chesterville, Ont. 

Harry Walker Keenan Ottawa, Ont. 

Stanley Richard Lang Toronto, Ont. 

Walton William Langford Hamilton, Ont. 

James Forest Lind Keewatin, Ont. 

Walter William Lomax St. Catharines, Ont. 

Cortlandt John Gordon Mackenzie Toronto, Ont. 

John Kenneth MacKenzie Lucknow, Ont. 

Ian Ross McLean Toronto, Ont. 

Lawrence Malloy Kingsville, Ont. 

Herbert Gordon Metcalfe, B.Sc Aylmer East, Que. 

Alvin Ketcheson Miller Belleville, Ont. 

Bruce Evan Morgan Hamilton, Ont. 

Desmond Francis Morrow Copper Cliff, Ont. 

Harold Ormond Murphy Saskatoon, Sask. 

Arthur Leslie Perry Canora, Sask. 

Allan Seymour Porter Kingston, Ont. 

Kasmar Vincent Rudnick Noranda, Que. 

Andrew Constantine Sawchuk Canora, Sask. 

Garnet Ralph Schamehorn Kingston, Ont. 

Milton Donald Snarch, B.A Montreal, Que. 

Irving Soloway Ottawa, Ont. 

Hugh Douglas Sproule Kingston, Ont. 

William Bradfield Stevens Vancouver, B.C. 

Cameron Colville Stewart Hamilton, Ont. 

Frank Joseph Stojan Trentoa, Ont. 

William Taylor Hamilton, Ont. 

Merle Leigh Trewin Ottawa, Ont. 

Henry Abram Unruh, A.B Kingston, Ont. 

Norman Ballantyne Urie Ottawa, Ont. 

William Elmer Warwick Vancouver, B.C. 

Ormond Allison Weir, B.A Peterborough, Ont. 

Donald Pearson Whittier Ottawa, Ont. 

First Year 

September, 1946, to May, 1947 

Frank George Adderley Toronto, Ont. 

Wilfred Stuart Bailey Toronto, Ontr 

John Edward Boak Victoria, B.C. 

Norman William Bradford Corbyville, Ont. 

Campbell Glen Cameron Belleville, Ont. 


— 82 — 


Hugh Chisholm Campbell Toronto, Ont. 

James Wallace Charters Hamilton, Ont. 

Betty Cecilia Chinn Victoria, B.C. 

Robert William Cornett Hamilton, Ont. 

Kenneth George Cox Toronto, Ont. 

Ross Henderson Craig Ottawa, Ont. 

James Higgs Jefferson Daniels Belleville, Ont. 

Nicholas DeMarco Leaside, Ont. 

Robert Stevenson Dolman Hamilton, Ont. 

Ainslie Hamilton Dowd Ottawa, Ont. 

Benjamin Horace Dunn Aylmer East, Que. 

Emmett John Dunne - Ottawa, Ont. 

Benella Gallup Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Grahame Frewer Gower Midland, Ont. 

John James Goyeche Westmount, Que. 

Sydney Lrewis Handford - Amprior, Ont. 

Frederick Elton Hemingway Hamilton, Ont. 

John Henry Hemming - Hamilton, Ont. 

Ernest Harold Holland Rocanville, Sask. 

Norman Stewart Jones Toronto, Ont. 

Eric Ronald Keirstead Hillsboro, N.B. 

Harold Eugene Laycock Walter’s Falls, Ont. 

Robert Henry Lee St. John, N.B. 

Alice Jean Lett Snow Road, Ont. 

Joseph Ernest Loree Guelph, Ont. 

Hugh Daniel Joseph McCoy .Ottawa, Ont. 

Hugh MacDonald Kingston, Ont. 

Charles Grant MacKenzie, B.A Oakville, Ont. 

Alexander Francis McKinnon Sudbury, Ont. 

Joseph Alexander MacLean Greenfield. Ont. 

Samuel Keith MacLean, B.Sc Sherbrooke, Que. 

William George Milligan Hamilton, Ont. 

David Emerson Moors Kingston, Ont. 

Leslie Louis Mould Orillia, Ont. 

John James Murie Hamilton, Ont. 

Frederick William Murphy Kingston, Ont. 

Margaret Lilian Peddie New Westminster, B.C. 

James Raphael Purvis Mallorytown, Ont. 

Leland Marlowe Read Regina, Sask. 

John Clifford Reid Oro Station, Ont. 

George Alexander Richardson Glasgow Station, Ont. 

Gordon Waldron Robertson Kingston, Ont. 

Lome Edward Ross Richmond, Que. 

Harold Shibley Sexsmith ...._ Kingston, Ont. 

Hugh Allenby Sheppard Kingston, Ont. 


DATE DUE 

J ’ e cents will be charged for each 

Robert Garfield Tate ' 

Louis Jean Maurice Tremblay — 

Kenneth Paul Vassal Niaga al 

Hubert Gerald Wagar, B.A Belle /ille, One 

Nathan Weldman Toronto, Ont. 

Orville Badham Wilson Ottawa, Ont. 

John Clifton Wyllie Kingston, Ont. 

Donald Elliott Zarfas Orillia, Ont. 


REGISTRATION IN MEDICINE FROM SEPTEMBER 23, 1946 
TO MAY 17, 1947 

Sixth year 41 

Fourth year - 48 

Third year 52 

Second year 56 

First year 61 


258 


— 84 — 


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